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authorcvs2svn <cvs2svn@FreeBSD.org>1994-11-09 20:27:33 +0000
committercvs2svn <cvs2svn@FreeBSD.org>1994-11-09 20:27:33 +0000
commite382a3a979c7d544140dcf27147123fe0f979838 (patch)
tree630c0fddba2191fffd35fd62241c49fc9dd46a37 /share/FAQ
parentd216e1f6de8c4ada202866bfe7ab788a4a139b9c (diff)
downloadsrc-e382a3a979c7d544140dcf27147123fe0f979838.tar.gz
src-e382a3a979c7d544140dcf27147123fe0f979838.zip
This commit was manufactured by cvs2svn to create branch 'ALPHA_2_0'.
Notes
Notes: svn path=/releng/ALPHA_2_0/; revision=4325
Diffstat (limited to 'share/FAQ')
-rw-r--r--share/FAQ/DISKSPACE.FAQ59
-rw-r--r--share/FAQ/RELNOTES.FreeBSD14
2 files changed, 38 insertions, 35 deletions
diff --git a/share/FAQ/DISKSPACE.FAQ b/share/FAQ/DISKSPACE.FAQ
index c6455e916d30..fb18dc9bb200 100644
--- a/share/FAQ/DISKSPACE.FAQ
+++ b/share/FAQ/DISKSPACE.FAQ
@@ -44,26 +44,27 @@ It was later realized, with the hindsight that IBM is famous for, that disks
could be bigger than the 32Mb that the early DOS FAT-12 file system could
handle, so they added a kludge: They had two MSDOS slices, a "Primary" and
a "Secondary". The primary could still only be 32Mb, but the Secondary had
-no size limit. And the trick was that the secondary had ANOTHER "table entry"
-so that now suddenly up to 5 slices could be available to MS-DOS. The
-Secondary boot record was later made recursive, thus effectively avoiding
-any fixed limit. Of course, they were still stuck with a maximum of 26 slices
-given the use of "drive letters" in DOS. They also reserved only 10 bits
-for cylinder addressing, limiting DOS to being able to address a maximum
-of 1024 cylinders (and cause of the dreaded "cylinder translation" kludges,
-the misconfiguration of which many users have seen as the notorious "Missing
-Operating System" message). Yes, truly DOS was and is an utterly terrible
-operating system, which of course explains its amazing degree of success.
-Anyway, this all brings us up to today, which is where FreeBSD comes in:
+no size limit. And the trick was that the secondary had ANOTHER "table
+entry" so that now suddenly up to 5 slices could be available to MS-DOS.
+The Secondary boot record was later made recursive, thus effectively
+avoiding any fixed limit. Of course, they were still stuck with a maximum
+of 26 slices given the use of "drive letters" in DOS. They also reserved
+only 10 bits for cylinder addressing, limiting DOS to being able to address
+a maximum of 1024 cylinders (and cause of the dreaded "cylinder translation"
+kludges, the misconfiguration of which many users have seen as the notorious
+"Missing Operating System" message). Yes, truly DOS was and is an utterly
+terrible operating system, which of course explains its amazing degree of
+success. Anyway, this all brings us up to today, which is where FreeBSD
+comes in:
1.2 What FreeBSD does
----------------------
FreeBSD has, like any other UNIX-like operating system, the concept of
-"partitions." Partitions are used to implement its own "slicing" abstraction,
-and although there is no real difference between a slice and a partition as
-such, we use the two words to distinguish between these two different levels
-of slicing.
+"partitions." Partitions are used to implement its own "slicing"
+abstraction, and although there is no real difference between a slice and a
+partition as such, we use the two words to distinguish between these two
+different levels of slicing.
The result is that we have a two-tier structure on the disk:
@@ -155,9 +156,9 @@ operating system entries!
Even if you don't plan to have MSDOS on a disk, make an MSDOS slice
using the MSDOS's FDISK.COM program. The reason for this is that if you
do it that way, you are 100% sure that FreeBSD will use the same number
-of heads, sectors and cylinders as MSDOS would use. If you really don't plan
-to have MSDOS on the disk, just (D)elete the slice in the FreeBSD's (F)disk
-editor.
+of heads, sectors and cylinders as MSDOS would use. If you really don't
+plan to have MSDOS on the disk, just (D)elete the slice in the FreeBSD's
+(F)disk editor.
From the main screen press 'F' to enter the MBR editor. You have five
commands available:
@@ -168,14 +169,14 @@ commands available:
(E)dit -- Allows you to edit a slice. It will ask how many megabytes
you want to assign to the slice, and will suggest the maximum possible
- as a default. It might say zero, even though there is disk space available,
- in which case you will probably need to delete and recreate the other
- partitions to get it to see where the free space is.
+ as a default. It might say zero, even though there is disk space
+ available, in which case you will probably need to delete and recreate the
+ other partitions to get it to see where the free space is.
It will then ask you what type to give the slice, for which the default is
- 0xa5 (a FreeBSD slice). You can enter any other number here too, which can
- be useful as a placeholder for some other OS you plan to install later.
- Finally, it will ask you about the "boot flag". 0x80 means "boot from this"
- slice by default, and anything else means "don't".
+ 0xa5 (a FreeBSD slice). You can enter any other number here too, which
+ can be useful as a placeholder for some other OS you plan to install
+ later. Finally, it will ask you about the "boot flag". 0x80 means "boot
+ from this" slice by default, and anything else means "don't".
If you specified a FreeBSD slice, any existing slices with the 0xa5
type will be reset to 0x00 "unused". FreeBSD only supports one slice
@@ -240,9 +241,9 @@ applicatins, here are some good rules of thumb to follow:
3. /usr can take up the rest of your disk, though some people like to create
extra partitions for user home directories and the like. Be sure to make
- your /usr big enough to contain the system software (about 50MB) and perhaps
- some of your own, unless you're going to use symbolic links to point things
- like /usr/local (or /usr/src) somewhere else.
+ your /usr big enough to contain the system software (about 50MB) and
+ perhaps some of your own, unless you're going to use symbolic links to
+ point things like /usr/local (or /usr/src) somewhere else.
Here are some suggested filesystem names and sizes, just for reference:
@@ -259,4 +260,4 @@ Mountpoint Filesystem size
/usr/X11R6 50Mb If you load the entire XFree86 binary kit.
-$Id: DISKSPACE.FAQ,v 1.2 1994/11/05 06:54:49 jkh Exp $
+$Id: DISKSPACE.FAQ,v 1.3 1994/11/07 10:35:54 jkh Exp $
diff --git a/share/FAQ/RELNOTES.FreeBSD b/share/FAQ/RELNOTES.FreeBSD
index 7c33cacf92be..f35e73c7c196 100644
--- a/share/FAQ/RELNOTES.FreeBSD
+++ b/share/FAQ/RELNOTES.FreeBSD
@@ -41,9 +41,9 @@ The core of FreeBSD does not contain DES code which would inhibit its
being exported outside the United States. There is an add-on package
to the core distribution, for use only in the United States, that
contains the programs that normally use DES. The auxilliary packages
-provided separately can be used by anyone. A freely (from outside the U.S.)
-exportable European distribution of DES for our non U.S. users also exists
-and is described in the FreeBSD FAQ.
+provided separately can be used by anyone. A freely (from outside the
+U.S.) exportable European distribution of DES for our non U.S. users also
+exists and is described in the FreeBSD FAQ.
1.1 What's new in 2.0?
----------------------
@@ -118,8 +118,9 @@ Sources involved: sys/*fs, lkm/*fs, usr.bin/lsvfs, lib/libc/gen
S/Key
-----
-Since version 1.1.5, FreeBSD has supported the S/Key one time password scheme.
-The version used is derived from the logdaemon package of Wietse Venema.
+Since version 1.1.5, FreeBSD has supported the S/Key one time password
+scheme. The version used is derived from the logdaemon package of Wietse
+Venema.
Some of the features new in 2.0 are:
- New access control table format to impose the use of S/Keys
based on: hostname, ip address, port, username, group id.
@@ -458,6 +459,7 @@ The FreeBSD "core" team:
Gary Palmer
Geoff Rehmet
Paul Richards
+ Soren Schmidt
Andreas Schulz
Jack Vogel
Garrett A. Wollman
@@ -493,4 +495,4 @@ hope you enjoy this release of FreeBSD!
The FreeBSD Core Team
-$Id: RELNOTES.FreeBSD,v 1.2 1994/11/07 10:35:55 jkh Exp $
+$Id: RELNOTES.FreeBSD,v 1.4 1994/11/08 20:17:45 jkh Exp $