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authorAndrey A. Chernov <ache@FreeBSD.org>2004-10-18 08:14:48 +0000
committerAndrey A. Chernov <ache@FreeBSD.org>2004-10-18 08:14:48 +0000
commit1708dd06c1bb19f7578bd44156daf8f90c296a62 (patch)
tree2e0138debe332a087b73b8ae8a6cc41f29fa5a71
parente5ce20496d1a1c93eeac0079c7a3785dd22a6da3 (diff)
downloadsrc-1708dd06c1bb19f7578bd44156daf8f90c296a62.tar.gz
src-1708dd06c1bb19f7578bd44156daf8f90c296a62.zip
This files no longer used
Asked-by: ru
Notes
Notes: svn path=/vendor/libreadline/dist/; revision=136656
-rw-r--r--contrib/libreadline/doc/hist.texinfo110
-rw-r--r--contrib/libreadline/doc/hstech.texinfo550
-rw-r--r--contrib/libreadline/doc/hsuser.texinfo437
-rw-r--r--contrib/libreadline/doc/manvers.texinfo10
-rw-r--r--contrib/libreadline/doc/rlman.texinfo108
-rw-r--r--contrib/libreadline/doc/rltech.texinfo2165
-rw-r--r--contrib/libreadline/doc/rluser.texinfo1796
-rw-r--r--contrib/libreadline/doc/rluserman.texinfo94
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diff --git a/contrib/libreadline/doc/hist.texinfo b/contrib/libreadline/doc/hist.texinfo
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-\input texinfo @c -*-texinfo-*-
-@c %**start of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-@setfilename history.info
-@settitle GNU History Library
-@c %**end of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-
-@setchapternewpage odd
-
-@include manvers.texinfo
-
-@ifinfo
-@dircategory Libraries
-@direntry
-* History: (history). The GNU history library API
-@end direntry
-
-This document describes the GNU History library, a programming tool that
-provides a consistent user interface for recalling lines of previously
-typed input.
-
-Copyright (C) 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
-this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
-pare preserved on all copies.
-
-@ignore
-Permission is granted to process this file through TeX and print the
-results, provided the printed document carries copying permission
-notice identical to this one except for the removal of this paragraph
-(this paragraph not being relevant to the printed manual).
-@end ignore
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the entire
-resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission
-notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions,
-except that this permission notice may be stated in a translation approved
-by the Free Software Foundation.
-@end ifinfo
-
-@titlepage
-@title GNU History Library
-@subtitle Edition @value{EDITION}, for @code{History Library} Version @value{VERSION}.
-@subtitle @value{UPDATE-MONTH}
-@author Brian Fox, Free Software Foundation
-@author Chet Ramey, Case Western Reserve University
-
-@page
-This document describes the GNU History library, a programming tool that
-provides a consistent user interface for recalling lines of previously
-typed input.
-
-Published by the Free Software Foundation @*
-59 Temple Place, Suite 330, @*
-Boston, MA 02111 USA
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
-this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
-are preserved on all copies.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the entire
-resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission
-notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions,
-except that this permission notice may be stated in a translation approved
-by the Free Software Foundation.
-
-@vskip 0pt plus 1filll
-Copyright @copyright{} 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-@end titlepage
-
-@ifinfo
-@node Top
-@top GNU History Library
-
-This document describes the GNU History library, a programming tool that
-provides a consistent user interface for recalling lines of previously
-typed input.
-
-@menu
-* Using History Interactively:: GNU History User's Manual.
-* Programming with GNU History:: GNU History Programmer's Manual.
-* Concept Index:: Index of concepts described in this manual.
-* Function and Variable Index:: Index of externally visible functions
- and variables.
-@end menu
-@end ifinfo
-
-@syncodeindex fn vr
-
-@include hsuser.texinfo
-@include hstech.texinfo
-
-@node Concept Index
-@appendix Concept Index
-@printindex cp
-
-@node Function and Variable Index
-@appendix Function and Variable Index
-@printindex vr
-
-@contents
-@bye
diff --git a/contrib/libreadline/doc/hstech.texinfo b/contrib/libreadline/doc/hstech.texinfo
deleted file mode 100644
index 949444668fcf..000000000000
--- a/contrib/libreadline/doc/hstech.texinfo
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,550 +0,0 @@
-@ignore
-This file documents the user interface to the GNU History library.
-
-Copyright (C) 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-Authored by Brian Fox and Chet Ramey.
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this manual
-provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are preserved on
-all copies.
-
-Permission is granted to process this file through Tex and print the
-results, provided the printed document carries copying permission notice
-identical to this one except for the removal of this paragraph (this
-paragraph not being relevant to the printed manual).
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided also that the
-GNU Copyright statement is available to the distributee, and provided that
-the entire resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a
-permission notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions.
-@end ignore
-
-@node Programming with GNU History
-@chapter Programming with GNU History
-
-This chapter describes how to interface programs that you write
-with the @sc{gnu} History Library.
-It should be considered a technical guide.
-For information on the interactive use of @sc{gnu} History, @pxref{Using
-History Interactively}.
-
-@menu
-* Introduction to History:: What is the GNU History library for?
-* History Storage:: How information is stored.
-* History Functions:: Functions that you can use.
-* History Variables:: Variables that control behaviour.
-* History Programming Example:: Example of using the GNU History Library.
-@end menu
-
-@node Introduction to History
-@section Introduction to History
-
-Many programs read input from the user a line at a time. The @sc{gnu}
-History library is able to keep track of those lines, associate arbitrary
-data with each line, and utilize information from previous lines in
-composing new ones.
-
-The programmer using the History library has available functions
-for remembering lines on a history list, associating arbitrary data
-with a line, removing lines from the list, searching through the list
-for a line containing an arbitrary text string, and referencing any line
-in the list directly. In addition, a history @dfn{expansion} function
-is available which provides for a consistent user interface across
-different programs.
-
-The user using programs written with the History library has the
-benefit of a consistent user interface with a set of well-known
-commands for manipulating the text of previous lines and using that text
-in new commands. The basic history manipulation commands are similar to
-the history substitution provided by @code{csh}.
-
-If the programmer desires, he can use the Readline library, which
-includes some history manipulation by default, and has the added
-advantage of command line editing.
-
-Before declaring any functions using any functionality the History
-library provides in other code, an application writer should include
-the file @code{<readline/history.h>} in any file that uses the
-History library's features. It supplies extern declarations for all
-of the library's public functions and variables, and declares all of
-the public data structures.
-
-@node History Storage
-@section History Storage
-
-The history list is an array of history entries. A history entry is
-declared as follows:
-
-@example
-typedef void *histdata_t;
-
-typedef struct _hist_entry @{
- char *line;
- histdata_t data;
-@} HIST_ENTRY;
-@end example
-
-The history list itself might therefore be declared as
-
-@example
-HIST_ENTRY **the_history_list;
-@end example
-
-The state of the History library is encapsulated into a single structure:
-
-@example
-/*
- * A structure used to pass around the current state of the history.
- */
-typedef struct _hist_state @{
- HIST_ENTRY **entries; /* Pointer to the entries themselves. */
- int offset; /* The location pointer within this array. */
- int length; /* Number of elements within this array. */
- int size; /* Number of slots allocated to this array. */
- int flags;
-@} HISTORY_STATE;
-@end example
-
-If the flags member includes @code{HS_STIFLED}, the history has been
-stifled.
-
-@node History Functions
-@section History Functions
-
-This section describes the calling sequence for the various functions
-exported by the @sc{gnu} History library.
-
-@menu
-* Initializing History and State Management:: Functions to call when you
- want to use history in a
- program.
-* History List Management:: Functions used to manage the list
- of history entries.
-* Information About the History List:: Functions returning information about
- the history list.
-* Moving Around the History List:: Functions used to change the position
- in the history list.
-* Searching the History List:: Functions to search the history list
- for entries containing a string.
-* Managing the History File:: Functions that read and write a file
- containing the history list.
-* History Expansion:: Functions to perform csh-like history
- expansion.
-@end menu
-
-@node Initializing History and State Management
-@subsection Initializing History and State Management
-
-This section describes functions used to initialize and manage
-the state of the History library when you want to use the history
-functions in your program.
-
-@deftypefun void using_history (void)
-Begin a session in which the history functions might be used. This
-initializes the interactive variables.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {HISTORY_STATE *} history_get_history_state (void)
-Return a structure describing the current state of the input history.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void history_set_history_state (HISTORY_STATE *state)
-Set the state of the history list according to @var{state}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node History List Management
-@subsection History List Management
-
-These functions manage individual entries on the history list, or set
-parameters managing the list itself.
-
-@deftypefun void add_history (const char *string)
-Place @var{string} at the end of the history list. The associated data
-field (if any) is set to @code{NULL}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {HIST_ENTRY *} remove_history (int which)
-Remove history entry at offset @var{which} from the history. The
-removed element is returned so you can free the line, data,
-and containing structure.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {HIST_ENTRY *} replace_history_entry (int which, const char *line, histdata_t data)
-Make the history entry at offset @var{which} have @var{line} and @var{data}.
-This returns the old entry so you can dispose of the data. In the case
-of an invalid @var{which}, a @code{NULL} pointer is returned.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void clear_history (void)
-Clear the history list by deleting all the entries.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void stifle_history (int max)
-Stifle the history list, remembering only the last @var{max} entries.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int unstifle_history (void)
-Stop stifling the history. This returns the previously-set
-maximum number of history entries (as set by @code{stifle_history()}).
-The value is positive if the history was
-stifled, negative if it wasn't.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int history_is_stifled (void)
-Returns non-zero if the history is stifled, zero if it is not.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Information About the History List
-@subsection Information About the History List
-
-These functions return information about the entire history list or
-individual list entries.
-
-@deftypefun {HIST_ENTRY **} history_list (void)
-Return a @code{NULL} terminated array of @code{HIST_ENTRY *} which is the
-current input history. Element 0 of this list is the beginning of time.
-If there is no history, return @code{NULL}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int where_history (void)
-Returns the offset of the current history element.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {HIST_ENTRY *} current_history (void)
-Return the history entry at the current position, as determined by
-@code{where_history()}. If there is no entry there, return a @code{NULL}
-pointer.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {HIST_ENTRY *} history_get (int offset)
-Return the history entry at position @var{offset}, starting from
-@code{history_base} (@pxref{History Variables}).
-If there is no entry there, or if @var{offset}
-is greater than the history length, return a @code{NULL} pointer.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int history_total_bytes (void)
-Return the number of bytes that the primary history entries are using.
-This function returns the sum of the lengths of all the lines in the
-history.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Moving Around the History List
-@subsection Moving Around the History List
-
-These functions allow the current index into the history list to be
-set or changed.
-
-@deftypefun int history_set_pos (int pos)
-Set the current history offset to @var{pos}, an absolute index
-into the list.
-Returns 1 on success, 0 if @var{pos} is less than zero or greater
-than the number of history entries.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {HIST_ENTRY *} previous_history (void)
-Back up the current history offset to the previous history entry, and
-return a pointer to that entry. If there is no previous entry, return
-a @code{NULL} pointer.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {HIST_ENTRY *} next_history (void)
-Move the current history offset forward to the next history entry, and
-return the a pointer to that entry. If there is no next entry, return
-a @code{NULL} pointer.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Searching the History List
-@subsection Searching the History List
-@cindex History Searching
-
-These functions allow searching of the history list for entries containing
-a specific string. Searching may be performed both forward and backward
-from the current history position. The search may be @dfn{anchored},
-meaning that the string must match at the beginning of the history entry.
-@cindex anchored search
-
-@deftypefun int history_search (const char *string, int direction)
-Search the history for @var{string}, starting at the current history offset.
-If @var{direction} is less than 0, then the search is through
-previous entries, otherwise through subsequent entries.
-If @var{string} is found, then
-the current history index is set to that history entry, and the value
-returned is the offset in the line of the entry where
-@var{string} was found. Otherwise, nothing is changed, and a -1 is
-returned.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int history_search_prefix (const char *string, int direction)
-Search the history for @var{string}, starting at the current history
-offset. The search is anchored: matching lines must begin with
-@var{string}. If @var{direction} is less than 0, then the search is
-through previous entries, otherwise through subsequent entries.
-If @var{string} is found, then the
-current history index is set to that entry, and the return value is 0.
-Otherwise, nothing is changed, and a -1 is returned.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int history_search_pos (const char *string, int direction, int pos)
-Search for @var{string} in the history list, starting at @var{pos}, an
-absolute index into the list. If @var{direction} is negative, the search
-proceeds backward from @var{pos}, otherwise forward. Returns the absolute
-index of the history element where @var{string} was found, or -1 otherwise.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Managing the History File
-@subsection Managing the History File
-
-The History library can read the history from and write it to a file.
-This section documents the functions for managing a history file.
-
-@deftypefun int read_history (const char *filename)
-Add the contents of @var{filename} to the history list, a line at a time.
-If @var{filename} is @code{NULL}, then read from @file{~/.history}.
-Returns 0 if successful, or @code{errno} if not.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int read_history_range (const char *filename, int from, int to)
-Read a range of lines from @var{filename}, adding them to the history list.
-Start reading at line @var{from} and end at @var{to}.
-If @var{from} is zero, start at the beginning. If @var{to} is less than
-@var{from}, then read until the end of the file. If @var{filename} is
-@code{NULL}, then read from @file{~/.history}. Returns 0 if successful,
-or @code{errno} if not.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int write_history (const char *filename)
-Write the current history to @var{filename}, overwriting @var{filename}
-if necessary.
-If @var{filename} is @code{NULL}, then write the history list to
-@file{~/.history}.
-Returns 0 on success, or @code{errno} on a read or write error.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int append_history (int nelements, const char *filename)
-Append the last @var{nelements} of the history list to @var{filename}.
-If @var{filename} is @code{NULL}, then append to @file{~/.history}.
-Returns 0 on success, or @code{errno} on a read or write error.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int history_truncate_file (const char *filename, int nlines)
-Truncate the history file @var{filename}, leaving only the last
-@var{nlines} lines.
-If @var{filename} is @code{NULL}, then @file{~/.history} is truncated.
-Returns 0 on success, or @code{errno} on failure.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node History Expansion
-@subsection History Expansion
-
-These functions implement history expansion.
-
-@deftypefun int history_expand (char *string, char **output)
-Expand @var{string}, placing the result into @var{output}, a pointer
-to a string (@pxref{History Interaction}). Returns:
-@table @code
-@item 0
-If no expansions took place (or, if the only change in
-the text was the removal of escape characters preceding the history expansion
-character);
-@item 1
-if expansions did take place;
-@item -1
-if there was an error in expansion;
-@item 2
-if the returned line should be displayed, but not executed,
-as with the @code{:p} modifier (@pxref{Modifiers}).
-@end table
-
-If an error ocurred in expansion, then @var{output} contains a descriptive
-error message.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char *} get_history_event (const char *string, int *cindex, int qchar)
-Returns the text of the history event beginning at @var{string} +
-@var{*cindex}. @var{*cindex} is modified to point to after the event
-specifier. At function entry, @var{cindex} points to the index into
-@var{string} where the history event specification begins. @var{qchar}
-is a character that is allowed to end the event specification in addition
-to the ``normal'' terminating characters.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char **} history_tokenize (const char *string)
-Return an array of tokens parsed out of @var{string}, much as the
-shell might. The tokens are split on the characters in the
-@var{history_word_delimiters} variable,
-and shell quoting conventions are obeyed.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char *} history_arg_extract (int first, int last, const char *string)
-Extract a string segment consisting of the @var{first} through @var{last}
-arguments present in @var{string}. Arguments are split using
-@code{history_tokenize}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node History Variables
-@section History Variables
-
-This section describes the externally-visible variables exported by
-the @sc{gnu} History Library.
-
-@deftypevar int history_base
-The logical offset of the first entry in the history list.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int history_length
-The number of entries currently stored in the history list.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int history_max_entries
-The maximum number of history entries. This must be changed using
-@code{stifle_history()}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar char history_expansion_char
-The character that introduces a history event. The default is @samp{!}.
-Setting this to 0 inhibits history expansion.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar char history_subst_char
-The character that invokes word substitution if found at the start of
-a line. The default is @samp{^}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar char history_comment_char
-During tokenization, if this character is seen as the first character
-of a word, then it and all subsequent characters up to a newline are
-ignored, suppressing history expansion for the remainder of the line.
-This is disabled by default.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {char *} history_word_delimiters
-The characters that separate tokens for @code{history_tokenize()}.
-The default value is @code{" \t\n()<>;&|"}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {char *} history_no_expand_chars
-The list of characters which inhibit history expansion if found immediately
-following @var{history_expansion_char}. The default is space, tab, newline,
-carriage return, and @samp{=}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {char *} history_search_delimiter_chars
-The list of additional characters which can delimit a history search
-string, in addition to space, TAB, @samp{:} and @samp{?} in the case of
-a substring search. The default is empty.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int history_quotes_inhibit_expansion
-If non-zero, single-quoted words are not scanned for the history expansion
-character. The default value is 0.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_linebuf_func_t *} history_inhibit_expansion_function
-This should be set to the address of a function that takes two arguments:
-a @code{char *} (@var{string})
-and an @code{int} index into that string (@var{i}).
-It should return a non-zero value if the history expansion starting at
-@var{string[i]} should not be performed; zero if the expansion should
-be done.
-It is intended for use by applications like Bash that use the history
-expansion character for additional purposes.
-By default, this variable is set to @code{NULL}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@node History Programming Example
-@section History Programming Example
-
-The following program demonstrates simple use of the @sc{gnu} History Library.
-
-@smallexample
-#include <stdio.h>
-#include <readline/history.h>
-
-main (argc, argv)
- int argc;
- char **argv;
-@{
- char line[1024], *t;
- int len, done = 0;
-
- line[0] = 0;
-
- using_history ();
- while (!done)
- @{
- printf ("history$ ");
- fflush (stdout);
- t = fgets (line, sizeof (line) - 1, stdin);
- if (t && *t)
- @{
- len = strlen (t);
- if (t[len - 1] == '\n')
- t[len - 1] = '\0';
- @}
-
- if (!t)
- strcpy (line, "quit");
-
- if (line[0])
- @{
- char *expansion;
- int result;
-
- result = history_expand (line, &expansion);
- if (result)
- fprintf (stderr, "%s\n", expansion);
-
- if (result < 0 || result == 2)
- @{
- free (expansion);
- continue;
- @}
-
- add_history (expansion);
- strncpy (line, expansion, sizeof (line) - 1);
- free (expansion);
- @}
-
- if (strcmp (line, "quit") == 0)
- done = 1;
- else if (strcmp (line, "save") == 0)
- write_history ("history_file");
- else if (strcmp (line, "read") == 0)
- read_history ("history_file");
- else if (strcmp (line, "list") == 0)
- @{
- register HIST_ENTRY **the_list;
- register int i;
-
- the_list = history_list ();
- if (the_list)
- for (i = 0; the_list[i]; i++)
- printf ("%d: %s\n", i + history_base, the_list[i]->line);
- @}
- else if (strncmp (line, "delete", 6) == 0)
- @{
- int which;
- if ((sscanf (line + 6, "%d", &which)) == 1)
- @{
- HIST_ENTRY *entry = remove_history (which);
- if (!entry)
- fprintf (stderr, "No such entry %d\n", which);
- else
- @{
- free (entry->line);
- free (entry);
- @}
- @}
- else
- @{
- fprintf (stderr, "non-numeric arg given to `delete'\n");
- @}
- @}
- @}
-@}
-@end smallexample
diff --git a/contrib/libreadline/doc/hsuser.texinfo b/contrib/libreadline/doc/hsuser.texinfo
deleted file mode 100644
index 418bfa8eff65..000000000000
--- a/contrib/libreadline/doc/hsuser.texinfo
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,437 +0,0 @@
-@ignore
-This file documents the user interface to the GNU History library.
-
-Copyright (C) 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-Authored by Brian Fox and Chet Ramey.
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this manual
-provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are preserved on
-all copies.
-
-Permission is granted to process this file through Tex and print the
-results, provided the printed document carries copying permission notice
-identical to this one except for the removal of this paragraph (this
-paragraph not being relevant to the printed manual).
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided also that the
-GNU Copyright statement is available to the distributee, and provided that
-the entire resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a
-permission notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions.
-@end ignore
-
-@node Using History Interactively
-@chapter Using History Interactively
-
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-@defcodeindex bt
-@end ifclear
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-This chapter describes how to use the @sc{gnu} History Library
-interactively, from a user's standpoint.
-It should be considered a user's guide.
-For information on using the @sc{gnu} History Library in other programs,
-see the @sc{gnu} Readline Library Manual.
-@end ifset
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-This chapter describes how to use the @sc{gnu} History Library interactively,
-from a user's standpoint. It should be considered a user's guide. For
-information on using the @sc{gnu} History Library in your own programs,
-@pxref{Programming with GNU History}.
-@end ifclear
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-@menu
-* Bash History Facilities:: How Bash lets you manipulate your command
- history.
-* Bash History Builtins:: The Bash builtin commands that manipulate
- the command history.
-* History Interaction:: What it feels like using History as a user.
-@end menu
-@end ifset
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-@menu
-* History Interaction:: What it feels like using History as a user.
-@end menu
-@end ifclear
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-@node Bash History Facilities
-@section Bash History Facilities
-@cindex command history
-@cindex history list
-
-When the @option{-o history} option to the @code{set} builtin
-is enabled (@pxref{The Set Builtin}),
-the shell provides access to the @dfn{command history},
-the list of commands previously typed.
-The value of the @env{HISTSIZE} shell variable is used as the
-number of commands to save in a history list.
-The text of the last @env{$HISTSIZE}
-commands (default 500) is saved.
-The shell stores each command in the history list prior to
-parameter and variable expansion
-but after history expansion is performed, subject to the
-values of the shell variables
-@env{HISTIGNORE} and @env{HISTCONTROL}.
-
-When the shell starts up, the history is initialized from the
-file named by the @env{HISTFILE} variable (default @file{~/.bash_history}).
-The file named by the value of @env{HISTFILE} is truncated, if
-necessary, to contain no more than the number of lines specified by
-the value of the @env{HISTFILESIZE} variable.
-When an interactive shell exits, the last
-@env{$HISTSIZE} lines are copied from the history list to the file
-named by @env{$HISTFILE}.
-If the @code{histappend} shell option is set (@pxref{Bash Builtins}),
-the lines are appended to the history file,
-otherwise the history file is overwritten.
-If @env{HISTFILE}
-is unset, or if the history file is unwritable, the history is
-not saved. After saving the history, the history file is truncated
-to contain no more than @env{$HISTFILESIZE}
-lines. If @env{HISTFILESIZE} is not set, no truncation is performed.
-
-The builtin command @code{fc} may be used to list or edit and re-execute
-a portion of the history list.
-The @code{history} builtin may be used to display or modify the history
-list and manipulate the history file.
-When using command-line editing, search commands
-are available in each editing mode that provide access to the
-history list (@pxref{Commands For History}).
-
-The shell allows control over which commands are saved on the history
-list. The @env{HISTCONTROL} and @env{HISTIGNORE}
-variables may be set to cause the shell to save only a subset of the
-commands entered.
-The @code{cmdhist}
-shell option, if enabled, causes the shell to attempt to save each
-line of a multi-line command in the same history entry, adding
-semicolons where necessary to preserve syntactic correctness.
-The @code{lithist}
-shell option causes the shell to save the command with embedded newlines
-instead of semicolons.
-The @code{shopt} builtin is used to set these options.
-@xref{Bash Builtins}, for a description of @code{shopt}.
-
-@node Bash History Builtins
-@section Bash History Builtins
-@cindex history builtins
-
-Bash provides two builtin commands which manipulate the
-history list and history file.
-
-@table @code
-
-@item fc
-@btindex fc
-@example
-@code{fc [-e @var{ename}] [-nlr] [@var{first}] [@var{last}]}
-@code{fc -s [@var{pat}=@var{rep}] [@var{command}]}
-@end example
-
-Fix Command. In the first form, a range of commands from @var{first} to
-@var{last} is selected from the history list. Both @var{first} and
-@var{last} may be specified as a string (to locate the most recent
-command beginning with that string) or as a number (an index into the
-history list, where a negative number is used as an offset from the
-current command number). If @var{last} is not specified it is set to
-@var{first}. If @var{first} is not specified it is set to the previous
-command for editing and @minus{}16 for listing. If the @option{-l} flag is
-given, the commands are listed on standard output. The @option{-n} flag
-suppresses the command numbers when listing. The @option{-r} flag
-reverses the order of the listing. Otherwise, the editor given by
-@var{ename} is invoked on a file containing those commands. If
-@var{ename} is not given, the value of the following variable expansion
-is used: @code{$@{FCEDIT:-$@{EDITOR:-vi@}@}}. This says to use the
-value of the @env{FCEDIT} variable if set, or the value of the
-@env{EDITOR} variable if that is set, or @code{vi} if neither is set.
-When editing is complete, the edited commands are echoed and executed.
-
-In the second form, @var{command} is re-executed after each instance
-of @var{pat} in the selected command is replaced by @var{rep}.
-
-A useful alias to use with the @code{fc} command is @code{r='fc -s'}, so
-that typing @samp{r cc} runs the last command beginning with @code{cc}
-and typing @samp{r} re-executes the last command (@pxref{Aliases}).
-
-@item history
-@btindex history
-@example
-history [@var{n}]
-history -c
-history -d @var{offset}
-history [-anrw] [@var{filename}]
-history -ps @var{arg}
-@end example
-
-With no options, display the history list with line numbers.
-Lines prefixed with a @samp{*} have been modified.
-An argument of @var{n} lists only the last @var{n} lines.
-Options, if supplied, have the following meanings:
-
-@table @code
-@item -c
-Clear the history list. This may be combined
-with the other options to replace the history list completely.
-
-@item -d @var{offset}
-Delete the history entry at position @var{offset}.
-@var{offset} should be specified as it appears when the history is
-displayed.
-
-@item -a
-Append the new
-history lines (history lines entered since the beginning of the
-current Bash session) to the history file.
-
-@item -n
-Append the history lines not already read from the history file
-to the current history list. These are lines appended to the history
-file since the beginning of the current Bash session.
-
-@item -r
-Read the current history file and append its contents to
-the history list.
-
-@item -w
-Write out the current history to the history file.
-
-@item -p
-Perform history substitution on the @var{arg}s and display the result
-on the standard output, without storing the results in the history list.
-
-@item -s
-The @var{arg}s are added to the end of
-the history list as a single entry.
-
-@end table
-
-When any of the @option{-w}, @option{-r}, @option{-a}, or @option{-n} options is
-used, if @var{filename}
-is given, then it is used as the history file. If not, then
-the value of the @env{HISTFILE} variable is used.
-
-@end table
-@end ifset
-
-@node History Interaction
-@section History Expansion
-@cindex history expansion
-
-The History library provides a history expansion feature that is similar
-to the history expansion provided by @code{csh}. This section
-describes the syntax used to manipulate the history information.
-
-History expansions introduce words from the history list into
-the input stream, making it easy to repeat commands, insert the
-arguments to a previous command into the current input line, or
-fix errors in previous commands quickly.
-
-History expansion takes place in two parts. The first is to determine
-which line from the history list should be used during substitution.
-The second is to select portions of that line for inclusion into the
-current one. The line selected from the history is called the
-@dfn{event}, and the portions of that line that are acted upon are
-called @dfn{words}. Various @dfn{modifiers} are available to manipulate
-the selected words. The line is broken into words in the same fashion
-that Bash does, so that several words
-surrounded by quotes are considered one word.
-History expansions are introduced by the appearance of the
-history expansion character, which is @samp{!} by default.
-@ifset BashFeatures
-Only @samp{\} and @samp{'} may be used to escape the history expansion
-character.
-@end ifset
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-Several shell options settable with the @code{shopt}
-builtin (@pxref{Bash Builtins}) may be used to tailor
-the behavior of history expansion. If the
-@code{histverify} shell option is enabled, and Readline
-is being used, history substitutions are not immediately passed to
-the shell parser.
-Instead, the expanded line is reloaded into the Readline
-editing buffer for further modification.
-If Readline is being used, and the @code{histreedit}
-shell option is enabled, a failed history expansion will be
-reloaded into the Readline editing buffer for correction.
-The @option{-p} option to the @code{history} builtin command
-may be used to see what a history expansion will do before using it.
-The @option{-s} option to the @code{history} builtin may be used to
-add commands to the end of the history list without actually executing
-them, so that they are available for subsequent recall.
-This is most useful in conjunction with Readline.
-
-The shell allows control of the various characters used by the
-history expansion mechanism with the @code{histchars} variable.
-@end ifset
-
-@menu
-* Event Designators:: How to specify which history line to use.
-* Word Designators:: Specifying which words are of interest.
-* Modifiers:: Modifying the results of substitution.
-@end menu
-
-@node Event Designators
-@subsection Event Designators
-@cindex event designators
-
-An event designator is a reference to a command line entry in the
-history list.
-@cindex history events
-
-@table @asis
-
-@item @code{!}
-Start a history substitution, except when followed by a space, tab,
-the end of the line, @samp{=} or @samp{(}.
-
-@item @code{!@var{n}}
-Refer to command line @var{n}.
-
-@item @code{!-@var{n}}
-Refer to the command @var{n} lines back.
-
-@item @code{!!}
-Refer to the previous command. This is a synonym for @samp{!-1}.
-
-@item @code{!@var{string}}
-Refer to the most recent command starting with @var{string}.
-
-@item @code{!?@var{string}[?]}
-Refer to the most recent command containing @var{string}. The trailing
-@samp{?} may be omitted if the @var{string} is followed immediately by
-a newline.
-
-@item @code{^@var{string1}^@var{string2}^}
-Quick Substitution. Repeat the last command, replacing @var{string1}
-with @var{string2}. Equivalent to
-@code{!!:s/@var{string1}/@var{string2}/}.
-
-@item @code{!#}
-The entire command line typed so far.
-
-@end table
-
-@node Word Designators
-@subsection Word Designators
-
-Word designators are used to select desired words from the event.
-A @samp{:} separates the event specification from the word designator. It
-may be omitted if the word designator begins with a @samp{^}, @samp{$},
-@samp{*}, @samp{-}, or @samp{%}. Words are numbered from the beginning
-of the line, with the first word being denoted by 0 (zero). Words are
-inserted into the current line separated by single spaces.
-
-@need 0.75
-For example,
-
-@table @code
-@item !!
-designates the preceding command. When you type this, the preceding
-command is repeated in toto.
-
-@item !!:$
-designates the last argument of the preceding command. This may be
-shortened to @code{!$}.
-
-@item !fi:2
-designates the second argument of the most recent command starting with
-the letters @code{fi}.
-@end table
-
-@need 0.75
-Here are the word designators:
-
-@table @code
-
-@item 0 (zero)
-The @code{0}th word. For many applications, this is the command word.
-
-@item @var{n}
-The @var{n}th word.
-
-@item ^
-The first argument; that is, word 1.
-
-@item $
-The last argument.
-
-@item %
-The word matched by the most recent @samp{?@var{string}?} search.
-
-@item @var{x}-@var{y}
-A range of words; @samp{-@var{y}} abbreviates @samp{0-@var{y}}.
-
-@item *
-All of the words, except the @code{0}th. This is a synonym for @samp{1-$}.
-It is not an error to use @samp{*} if there is just one word in the event;
-the empty string is returned in that case.
-
-@item @var{x}*
-Abbreviates @samp{@var{x}-$}
-
-@item @var{x}-
-Abbreviates @samp{@var{x}-$} like @samp{@var{x}*}, but omits the last word.
-
-@end table
-
-If a word designator is supplied without an event specification, the
-previous command is used as the event.
-
-@node Modifiers
-@subsection Modifiers
-
-After the optional word designator, you can add a sequence of one or more
-of the following modifiers, each preceded by a @samp{:}.
-
-@table @code
-
-@item h
-Remove a trailing pathname component, leaving only the head.
-
-@item t
-Remove all leading pathname components, leaving the tail.
-
-@item r
-Remove a trailing suffix of the form @samp{.@var{suffix}}, leaving
-the basename.
-
-@item e
-Remove all but the trailing suffix.
-
-@item p
-Print the new command but do not execute it.
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-@item q
-Quote the substituted words, escaping further substitutions.
-
-@item x
-Quote the substituted words as with @samp{q},
-but break into words at spaces, tabs, and newlines.
-@end ifset
-
-@item s/@var{old}/@var{new}/
-Substitute @var{new} for the first occurrence of @var{old} in the
-event line. Any delimiter may be used in place of @samp{/}.
-The delimiter may be quoted in @var{old} and @var{new}
-with a single backslash. If @samp{&} appears in @var{new},
-it is replaced by @var{old}. A single backslash will quote
-the @samp{&}. The final delimiter is optional if it is the last
-character on the input line.
-
-@item &
-Repeat the previous substitution.
-
-@item g
-Cause changes to be applied over the entire event line. Used in
-conjunction with @samp{s}, as in @code{gs/@var{old}/@var{new}/},
-or with @samp{&}.
-
-@end table
diff --git a/contrib/libreadline/doc/manvers.texinfo b/contrib/libreadline/doc/manvers.texinfo
deleted file mode 100644
index 1206cf0f235d..000000000000
--- a/contrib/libreadline/doc/manvers.texinfo
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,10 +0,0 @@
-@ignore
-Copyright (C) 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-@end ignore
-
-@set EDITION 4.3
-@set VERSION 4.3
-@set UPDATED 2002 March 4
-@set UPDATE-MONTH March 2002
-
-@set LASTCHANGE Mon Mar 4 12:00:16 EST 2002
diff --git a/contrib/libreadline/doc/rlman.texinfo b/contrib/libreadline/doc/rlman.texinfo
deleted file mode 100644
index 1ffebad08a73..000000000000
--- a/contrib/libreadline/doc/rlman.texinfo
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,108 +0,0 @@
-\input texinfo @c -*-texinfo-*-
-@comment %**start of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-@setfilename readline.info
-@settitle GNU Readline Library
-@comment %**end of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-@synindex vr fn
-@setchapternewpage odd
-
-@include manvers.texinfo
-
-@ifinfo
-@dircategory Libraries
-@direntry
-* Readline: (readline). The GNU readline library API
-@end direntry
-
-This document describes the GNU Readline Library, a utility which aids
-in the consistency of user interface across discrete programs that need
-to provide a command line interface.
-
-Copyright (C) 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
-this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
-pare preserved on all copies.
-
-@ignore
-Permission is granted to process this file through TeX and print the
-results, provided the printed document carries copying permission
-notice identical to this one except for the removal of this paragraph
-(this paragraph not being relevant to the printed manual).
-@end ignore
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the entire
-resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission
-notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions,
-except that this permission notice may be stated in a translation approved
-by the Free Software Foundation.
-@end ifinfo
-
-@titlepage
-@title GNU Readline Library
-@subtitle Edition @value{EDITION}, for @code{Readline Library} Version @value{VERSION}.
-@subtitle @value{UPDATE-MONTH}
-@author Brian Fox, Free Software Foundation
-@author Chet Ramey, Case Western Reserve University
-
-@page
-This document describes the GNU Readline Library, a utility which aids
-in the consistency of user interface across discrete programs that need
-to provide a command line interface.
-
-Published by the Free Software Foundation @*
-59 Temple Place, Suite 330, @*
-Boston, MA 02111 USA
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
-this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
-are preserved on all copies.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the entire
-resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission
-notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions,
-except that this permission notice may be stated in a translation approved
-by the Free Software Foundation.
-
-@vskip 0pt plus 1filll
-Copyright @copyright{} 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-@end titlepage
-
-@ifinfo
-@node Top
-@top GNU Readline Library
-
-This document describes the GNU Readline Library, a utility which aids
-in the consistency of user interface across discrete programs that need
-to provide a command line interface.
-
-@menu
-* Command Line Editing:: GNU Readline User's Manual.
-* Programming with GNU Readline:: GNU Readline Programmer's Manual.
-* Concept Index:: Index of concepts described in this manual.
-* Function and Variable Index:: Index of externally visible functions
- and variables.
-@end menu
-@end ifinfo
-
-@include rluser.texinfo
-@include rltech.texinfo
-
-@node Concept Index
-@unnumbered Concept Index
-@printindex cp
-
-@node Function and Variable Index
-@unnumbered Function and Variable Index
-@printindex fn
-
-@contents
-@bye
diff --git a/contrib/libreadline/doc/rltech.texinfo b/contrib/libreadline/doc/rltech.texinfo
deleted file mode 100644
index 037e824e28ae..000000000000
--- a/contrib/libreadline/doc/rltech.texinfo
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,2165 +0,0 @@
-@comment %**start of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-@setfilename rltech.info
-@comment %**end of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-@setchapternewpage odd
-
-@ifinfo
-This document describes the GNU Readline Library, a utility for aiding
-in the consitency of user interface across discrete programs that need
-to provide a command line interface.
-
-Copyright (C) 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
-this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
-pare preserved on all copies.
-
-@ignore
-Permission is granted to process this file through TeX and print the
-results, provided the printed document carries copying permission
-notice identical to this one except for the removal of this paragraph
-(this paragraph not being relevant to the printed manual).
-@end ignore
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the entire
-resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission
-notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions,
-except that this permission notice may be stated in a translation approved
-by the Foundation.
-@end ifinfo
-
-@node Programming with GNU Readline
-@chapter Programming with GNU Readline
-
-This chapter describes the interface between the @sc{gnu} Readline Library and
-other programs. If you are a programmer, and you wish to include the
-features found in @sc{gnu} Readline
-such as completion, line editing, and interactive history manipulation
-in your own programs, this section is for you.
-
-@menu
-* Basic Behavior:: Using the default behavior of Readline.
-* Custom Functions:: Adding your own functions to Readline.
-* Readline Variables:: Variables accessible to custom
- functions.
-* Readline Convenience Functions:: Functions which Readline supplies to
- aid in writing your own custom
- functions.
-* Readline Signal Handling:: How Readline behaves when it receives signals.
-* Custom Completers:: Supplanting or supplementing Readline's
- completion functions.
-@end menu
-
-@node Basic Behavior
-@section Basic Behavior
-
-Many programs provide a command line interface, such as @code{mail},
-@code{ftp}, and @code{sh}. For such programs, the default behaviour of
-Readline is sufficient. This section describes how to use Readline in
-the simplest way possible, perhaps to replace calls in your code to
-@code{gets()} or @code{fgets()}.
-
-@findex readline
-@cindex readline, function
-
-The function @code{readline()} prints a prompt @var{prompt}
-and then reads and returns a single line of text from the user.
-If @var{prompt} is @code{NULL} or the empty string, no prompt is displayed.
-The line @code{readline} returns is allocated with @code{malloc()};
-the caller should @code{free()} the line when it has finished with it.
-The declaration for @code{readline} in ANSI C is
-
-@example
-@code{char *readline (const char *@var{prompt});}
-@end example
-
-@noindent
-So, one might say
-@example
-@code{char *line = readline ("Enter a line: ");}
-@end example
-@noindent
-in order to read a line of text from the user.
-The line returned has the final newline removed, so only the
-text remains.
-
-If @code{readline} encounters an @code{EOF} while reading the line, and the
-line is empty at that point, then @code{(char *)NULL} is returned.
-Otherwise, the line is ended just as if a newline had been typed.
-
-If you want the user to be able to get at the line later, (with
-@key{C-p} for example), you must call @code{add_history()} to save the
-line away in a @dfn{history} list of such lines.
-
-@example
-@code{add_history (line)};
-@end example
-
-@noindent
-For full details on the GNU History Library, see the associated manual.
-
-It is preferable to avoid saving empty lines on the history list, since
-users rarely have a burning need to reuse a blank line. Here is
-a function which usefully replaces the standard @code{gets()} library
-function, and has the advantage of no static buffer to overflow:
-
-@example
-/* A static variable for holding the line. */
-static char *line_read = (char *)NULL;
-
-/* Read a string, and return a pointer to it.
- Returns NULL on EOF. */
-char *
-rl_gets ()
-@{
- /* If the buffer has already been allocated,
- return the memory to the free pool. */
- if (line_read)
- @{
- free (line_read);
- line_read = (char *)NULL;
- @}
-
- /* Get a line from the user. */
- line_read = readline ("");
-
- /* If the line has any text in it,
- save it on the history. */
- if (line_read && *line_read)
- add_history (line_read);
-
- return (line_read);
-@}
-@end example
-
-This function gives the user the default behaviour of @key{TAB}
-completion: completion on file names. If you do not want Readline to
-complete on filenames, you can change the binding of the @key{TAB} key
-with @code{rl_bind_key()}.
-
-@example
-@code{int rl_bind_key (int @var{key}, rl_command_func_t *@var{function});}
-@end example
-
-@code{rl_bind_key()} takes two arguments: @var{key} is the character that
-you want to bind, and @var{function} is the address of the function to
-call when @var{key} is pressed. Binding @key{TAB} to @code{rl_insert()}
-makes @key{TAB} insert itself.
-@code{rl_bind_key()} returns non-zero if @var{key} is not a valid
-ASCII character code (between 0 and 255).
-
-Thus, to disable the default @key{TAB} behavior, the following suffices:
-@example
-@code{rl_bind_key ('\t', rl_insert);}
-@end example
-
-This code should be executed once at the start of your program; you
-might write a function called @code{initialize_readline()} which
-performs this and other desired initializations, such as installing
-custom completers (@pxref{Custom Completers}).
-
-@node Custom Functions
-@section Custom Functions
-
-Readline provides many functions for manipulating the text of
-the line, but it isn't possible to anticipate the needs of all
-programs. This section describes the various functions and variables
-defined within the Readline library which allow a user program to add
-customized functionality to Readline.
-
-Before declaring any functions that customize Readline's behavior, or
-using any functionality Readline provides in other code, an
-application writer should include the file @code{<readline/readline.h>}
-in any file that uses Readline's features. Since some of the definitions
-in @code{readline.h} use the @code{stdio} library, the file
-@code{<stdio.h>} should be included before @code{readline.h}.
-
-@code{readline.h} defines a C preprocessor variable that should
-be treated as an integer, @code{RL_READLINE_VERSION}, which may
-be used to conditionally compile application code depending on
-the installed Readline version. The value is a hexadecimal
-encoding of the major and minor version numbers of the library,
-of the form 0x@var{MMmm}. @var{MM} is the two-digit major
-version number; @var{mm} is the two-digit minor version number.
-For Readline 4.2, for example, the value of
-@code{RL_READLINE_VERSION} would be @code{0x0402}.
-
-@menu
-* Readline Typedefs:: C declarations to make code readable.
-* Function Writing:: Variables and calling conventions.
-@end menu
-
-@node Readline Typedefs
-@subsection Readline Typedefs
-
-For readabilty, we declare a number of new object types, all pointers
-to functions.
-
-The reason for declaring these new types is to make it easier to write
-code describing pointers to C functions with appropriately prototyped
-arguments and return values.
-
-For instance, say we want to declare a variable @var{func} as a pointer
-to a function which takes two @code{int} arguments and returns an
-@code{int} (this is the type of all of the Readline bindable functions).
-Instead of the classic C declaration
-
-@code{int (*func)();}
-
-@noindent
-or the ANSI-C style declaration
-
-@code{int (*func)(int, int);}
-
-@noindent
-we may write
-
-@code{rl_command_func_t *func;}
-
-The full list of function pointer types available is
-
-@table @code
-@item typedef int rl_command_func_t (int, int);
-
-@item typedef char *rl_compentry_func_t (const char *, int);
-
-@item typedef char **rl_completion_func_t (const char *, int, int);
-
-@item typedef char *rl_quote_func_t (char *, int, char *);
-
-@item typedef char *rl_dequote_func_t (char *, int);
-
-@item typedef int rl_compignore_func_t (char **);
-
-@item typedef void rl_compdisp_func_t (char **, int, int);
-
-@item typedef int rl_hook_func_t (void);
-
-@item typedef int rl_getc_func_t (FILE *);
-
-@item typedef int rl_linebuf_func_t (char *, int);
-
-@item typedef int rl_intfunc_t (int);
-@item #define rl_ivoidfunc_t rl_hook_func_t
-@item typedef int rl_icpfunc_t (char *);
-@item typedef int rl_icppfunc_t (char **);
-
-@item typedef void rl_voidfunc_t (void);
-@item typedef void rl_vintfunc_t (int);
-@item typedef void rl_vcpfunc_t (char *);
-@item typedef void rl_vcppfunc_t (char **);
-
-@end table
-
-@node Function Writing
-@subsection Writing a New Function
-
-In order to write new functions for Readline, you need to know the
-calling conventions for keyboard-invoked functions, and the names of the
-variables that describe the current state of the line read so far.
-
-The calling sequence for a command @code{foo} looks like
-
-@example
-@code{int foo (int count, int key)}
-@end example
-
-@noindent
-where @var{count} is the numeric argument (or 1 if defaulted) and
-@var{key} is the key that invoked this function.
-
-It is completely up to the function as to what should be done with the
-numeric argument. Some functions use it as a repeat count, some
-as a flag, and others to choose alternate behavior (refreshing the current
-line as opposed to refreshing the screen, for example). Some choose to
-ignore it. In general, if a
-function uses the numeric argument as a repeat count, it should be able
-to do something useful with both negative and positive arguments.
-At the very least, it should be aware that it can be passed a
-negative argument.
-
-A command function should return 0 if its action completes successfully,
-and a non-zero value if some error occurs.
-
-@node Readline Variables
-@section Readline Variables
-
-These variables are available to function writers.
-
-@deftypevar {char *} rl_line_buffer
-This is the line gathered so far. You are welcome to modify the
-contents of the line, but see @ref{Allowing Undoing}. The
-function @code{rl_extend_line_buffer} is available to increase
-the memory allocated to @code{rl_line_buffer}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_point
-The offset of the current cursor position in @code{rl_line_buffer}
-(the @emph{point}).
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_end
-The number of characters present in @code{rl_line_buffer}. When
-@code{rl_point} is at the end of the line, @code{rl_point} and
-@code{rl_end} are equal.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_mark
-The @var{mark} (saved position) in the current line. If set, the mark
-and point define a @emph{region}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_done
-Setting this to a non-zero value causes Readline to return the current
-line immediately.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_num_chars_to_read
-Setting this to a positive value before calling @code{readline()} causes
-Readline to return after accepting that many characters, rather
-than reading up to a character bound to @code{accept-line}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_pending_input
-Setting this to a value makes it the next keystroke read. This is a
-way to stuff a single character into the input stream.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_dispatching
-Set to a non-zero value if a function is being called from a key binding;
-zero otherwise. Application functions can test this to discover whether
-they were called directly or by Readline's dispatching mechanism.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_erase_empty_line
-Setting this to a non-zero value causes Readline to completely erase
-the current line, including any prompt, any time a newline is typed as
-the only character on an otherwise-empty line. The cursor is moved to
-the beginning of the newly-blank line.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {char *} rl_prompt
-The prompt Readline uses. This is set from the argument to
-@code{readline()}, and should not be assigned to directly.
-The @code{rl_set_prompt()} function (@pxref{Redisplay}) may
-be used to modify the prompt string after calling @code{readline()}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_already_prompted
-If an application wishes to display the prompt itself, rather than have
-Readline do it the first time @code{readline()} is called, it should set
-this variable to a non-zero value after displaying the prompt.
-The prompt must also be passed as the argument to @code{readline()} so
-the redisplay functions can update the display properly.
-The calling application is responsible for managing the value; Readline
-never sets it.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {const char *} rl_library_version
-The version number of this revision of the library.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_readline_version
-An integer encoding the current version of the library. The encoding is
-of the form 0x@var{MMmm}, where @var{MM} is the two-digit major version
-number, and @var{mm} is the two-digit minor version number.
-For example, for Readline-4.2, @code{rl_readline_version} would have the
-value 0x0402.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {int} rl_gnu_readline_p
-Always set to 1, denoting that this is @sc{gnu} readline rather than some
-emulation.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {const char *} rl_terminal_name
-The terminal type, used for initialization. If not set by the application,
-Readline sets this to the value of the @env{TERM} environment variable
-the first time it is called.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {const char *} rl_readline_name
-This variable is set to a unique name by each application using Readline.
-The value allows conditional parsing of the inputrc file
-(@pxref{Conditional Init Constructs}).
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {FILE *} rl_instream
-The stdio stream from which Readline reads input.
-If @code{NULL}, Readline defaults to @var{stdin}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {FILE *} rl_outstream
-The stdio stream to which Readline performs output.
-If @code{NULL}, Readline defaults to @var{stdout}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_command_func_t *} rl_last_func
-The address of the last command function Readline executed. May be used to
-test whether or not a function is being executed twice in succession, for
-example.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_hook_func_t *} rl_startup_hook
-If non-zero, this is the address of a function to call just
-before @code{readline} prints the first prompt.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_hook_func_t *} rl_pre_input_hook
-If non-zero, this is the address of a function to call after
-the first prompt has been printed and just before @code{readline}
-starts reading input characters.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_hook_func_t *} rl_event_hook
-If non-zero, this is the address of a function to call periodically
-when Readline is waiting for terminal input.
-By default, this will be called at most ten times a second if there
-is no keyboard input.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_getc_func_t *} rl_getc_function
-If non-zero, Readline will call indirectly through this pointer
-to get a character from the input stream. By default, it is set to
-@code{rl_getc}, the default Readline character input function
-(@pxref{Character Input}).
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_voidfunc_t *} rl_redisplay_function
-If non-zero, Readline will call indirectly through this pointer
-to update the display with the current contents of the editing buffer.
-By default, it is set to @code{rl_redisplay}, the default Readline
-redisplay function (@pxref{Redisplay}).
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_vintfunc_t *} rl_prep_term_function
-If non-zero, Readline will call indirectly through this pointer
-to initialize the terminal. The function takes a single argument, an
-@code{int} flag that says whether or not to use eight-bit characters.
-By default, this is set to @code{rl_prep_terminal}
-(@pxref{Terminal Management}).
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_voidfunc_t *} rl_deprep_term_function
-If non-zero, Readline will call indirectly through this pointer
-to reset the terminal. This function should undo the effects of
-@code{rl_prep_term_function}.
-By default, this is set to @code{rl_deprep_terminal}
-(@pxref{Terminal Management}).
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {Keymap} rl_executing_keymap
-This variable is set to the keymap (@pxref{Keymaps}) in which the
-currently executing readline function was found.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {Keymap} rl_binding_keymap
-This variable is set to the keymap (@pxref{Keymaps}) in which the
-last key binding occurred.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {char *} rl_executing_macro
-This variable is set to the text of any currently-executing macro.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {int} rl_readline_state
-A variable with bit values that encapsulate the current Readline state.
-A bit is set with the @code{RL_SETSTATE} macro, and unset with the
-@code{RL_UNSETSTATE} macro. Use the @code{RL_ISSTATE} macro to test
-whether a particular state bit is set. Current state bits include:
-
-@table @code
-@item RL_STATE_NONE
-Readline has not yet been called, nor has it begun to intialize.
-@item RL_STATE_INITIALIZING
-Readline is initializing its internal data structures.
-@item RL_STATE_INITIALIZED
-Readline has completed its initialization.
-@item RL_STATE_TERMPREPPED
-Readline has modified the terminal modes to do its own input and redisplay.
-@item RL_STATE_READCMD
-Readline is reading a command from the keyboard.
-@item RL_STATE_METANEXT
-Readline is reading more input after reading the meta-prefix character.
-@item RL_STATE_DISPATCHING
-Readline is dispatching to a command.
-@item RL_STATE_MOREINPUT
-Readline is reading more input while executing an editing command.
-@item RL_STATE_ISEARCH
-Readline is performing an incremental history search.
-@item RL_STATE_NSEARCH
-Readline is performing a non-incremental history search.
-@item RL_STATE_SEARCH
-Readline is searching backward or forward through the history for a string.
-@item RL_STATE_NUMERICARG
-Readline is reading a numeric argument.
-@item RL_STATE_MACROINPUT
-Readline is currently getting its input from a previously-defined keyboard
-macro.
-@item RL_STATE_MACRODEF
-Readline is currently reading characters defining a keyboard macro.
-@item RL_STATE_OVERWRITE
-Readline is in overwrite mode.
-@item RL_STATE_COMPLETING
-Readline is performing word completion.
-@item RL_STATE_SIGHANDLER
-Readline is currently executing the readline signal handler.
-@item RL_STATE_UNDOING
-Readline is performing an undo.
-@item RL_STATE_DONE
-Readline has read a key sequence bound to @code{accept-line}
-and is about to return the line to the caller.
-@end table
-
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {int} rl_explicit_arg
-Set to a non-zero value if an explicit numeric argument was specified by
-the user. Only valid in a bindable command function.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {int} rl_numeric_arg
-Set to the value of any numeric argument explicitly specified by the user
-before executing the current Readline function. Only valid in a bindable
-command function.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {int} rl_editing_mode
-Set to a value denoting Readline's current editing mode. A value of
-@var{1} means Readline is currently in emacs mode; @var{0}
-means that vi mode is active.
-@end deftypevar
-
-
-@node Readline Convenience Functions
-@section Readline Convenience Functions
-
-@menu
-* Function Naming:: How to give a function you write a name.
-* Keymaps:: Making keymaps.
-* Binding Keys:: Changing Keymaps.
-* Associating Function Names and Bindings:: Translate function names to
- key sequences.
-* Allowing Undoing:: How to make your functions undoable.
-* Redisplay:: Functions to control line display.
-* Modifying Text:: Functions to modify @code{rl_line_buffer}.
-* Character Input:: Functions to read keyboard input.
-* Terminal Management:: Functions to manage terminal settings.
-* Utility Functions:: Generally useful functions and hooks.
-* Miscellaneous Functions:: Functions that don't fall into any category.
-* Alternate Interface:: Using Readline in a `callback' fashion.
-* A Readline Example:: An example Readline function.
-@end menu
-
-@node Function Naming
-@subsection Naming a Function
-
-The user can dynamically change the bindings of keys while using
-Readline. This is done by representing the function with a descriptive
-name. The user is able to type the descriptive name when referring to
-the function. Thus, in an init file, one might find
-
-@example
-Meta-Rubout: backward-kill-word
-@end example
-
-This binds the keystroke @key{Meta-Rubout} to the function
-@emph{descriptively} named @code{backward-kill-word}. You, as the
-programmer, should bind the functions you write to descriptive names as
-well. Readline provides a function for doing that:
-
-@deftypefun int rl_add_defun (const char *name, rl_command_func_t *function, int key)
-Add @var{name} to the list of named functions. Make @var{function} be
-the function that gets called. If @var{key} is not -1, then bind it to
-@var{function} using @code{rl_bind_key()}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-Using this function alone is sufficient for most applications. It is
-the recommended way to add a few functions to the default functions that
-Readline has built in. If you need to do something other
-than adding a function to Readline, you may need to use the
-underlying functions described below.
-
-@node Keymaps
-@subsection Selecting a Keymap
-
-Key bindings take place on a @dfn{keymap}. The keymap is the
-association between the keys that the user types and the functions that
-get run. You can make your own keymaps, copy existing keymaps, and tell
-Readline which keymap to use.
-
-@deftypefun Keymap rl_make_bare_keymap (void)
-Returns a new, empty keymap. The space for the keymap is allocated with
-@code{malloc()}; the caller should free it by calling
-@code{rl_discard_keymap()} when done.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun Keymap rl_copy_keymap (Keymap map)
-Return a new keymap which is a copy of @var{map}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun Keymap rl_make_keymap (void)
-Return a new keymap with the printing characters bound to rl_insert,
-the lowercase Meta characters bound to run their equivalents, and
-the Meta digits bound to produce numeric arguments.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_discard_keymap (Keymap keymap)
-Free the storage associated with @var{keymap}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-Readline has several internal keymaps. These functions allow you to
-change which keymap is active.
-
-@deftypefun Keymap rl_get_keymap (void)
-Returns the currently active keymap.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_set_keymap (Keymap keymap)
-Makes @var{keymap} the currently active keymap.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun Keymap rl_get_keymap_by_name (const char *name)
-Return the keymap matching @var{name}. @var{name} is one which would
-be supplied in a @code{set keymap} inputrc line (@pxref{Readline Init File}).
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char *} rl_get_keymap_name (Keymap keymap)
-Return the name matching @var{keymap}. @var{name} is one which would
-be supplied in a @code{set keymap} inputrc line (@pxref{Readline Init File}).
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Binding Keys
-@subsection Binding Keys
-
-Key sequences are associate with functions through the keymap.
-Readline has several internal keymaps: @code{emacs_standard_keymap},
-@code{emacs_meta_keymap}, @code{emacs_ctlx_keymap},
-@code{vi_movement_keymap}, and @code{vi_insertion_keymap}.
-@code{emacs_standard_keymap} is the default, and the examples in
-this manual assume that.
-
-Since @code{readline()} installs a set of default key bindings the first
-time it is called, there is always the danger that a custom binding
-installed before the first call to @code{readline()} will be overridden.
-An alternate mechanism is to install custom key bindings in an
-initialization function assigned to the @code{rl_startup_hook} variable
-(@pxref{Readline Variables}).
-
-These functions manage key bindings.
-
-@deftypefun int rl_bind_key (int key, rl_command_func_t *function)
-Binds @var{key} to @var{function} in the currently active keymap.
-Returns non-zero in the case of an invalid @var{key}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_bind_key_in_map (int key, rl_command_func_t *function, Keymap map)
-Bind @var{key} to @var{function} in @var{map}. Returns non-zero in the case
-of an invalid @var{key}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_unbind_key (int key)
-Bind @var{key} to the null function in the currently active keymap.
-Returns non-zero in case of error.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_unbind_key_in_map (int key, Keymap map)
-Bind @var{key} to the null function in @var{map}.
-Returns non-zero in case of error.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_unbind_function_in_map (rl_command_func_t *function, Keymap map)
-Unbind all keys that execute @var{function} in @var{map}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_unbind_command_in_map (const char *command, Keymap map)
-Unbind all keys that are bound to @var{command} in @var{map}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_set_key (const char *keyseq, rl_command_func_t *function, Keymap map)
-Bind the key sequence represented by the string @var{keyseq} to the function
-@var{function}. This makes new keymaps as
-necessary. The initial keymap in which to do bindings is @var{map}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_generic_bind (int type, const char *keyseq, char *data, Keymap map)
-Bind the key sequence represented by the string @var{keyseq} to the arbitrary
-pointer @var{data}. @var{type} says what kind of data is pointed to by
-@var{data}; this can be a function (@code{ISFUNC}), a macro
-(@code{ISMACR}), or a keymap (@code{ISKMAP}). This makes new keymaps as
-necessary. The initial keymap in which to do bindings is @var{map}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_parse_and_bind (char *line)
-Parse @var{line} as if it had been read from the @code{inputrc} file and
-perform any key bindings and variable assignments found
-(@pxref{Readline Init File}).
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_read_init_file (const char *filename)
-Read keybindings and variable assignments from @var{filename}
-(@pxref{Readline Init File}).
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Associating Function Names and Bindings
-@subsection Associating Function Names and Bindings
-
-These functions allow you to find out what keys invoke named functions
-and the functions invoked by a particular key sequence. You may also
-associate a new function name with an arbitrary function.
-
-@deftypefun {rl_command_func_t *} rl_named_function (const char *name)
-Return the function with name @var{name}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {rl_command_func_t *} rl_function_of_keyseq (const char *keyseq, Keymap map, int *type)
-Return the function invoked by @var{keyseq} in keymap @var{map}.
-If @var{map} is @code{NULL}, the current keymap is used. If @var{type} is
-not @code{NULL}, the type of the object is returned in the @code{int} variable
-it points to (one of @code{ISFUNC}, @code{ISKMAP}, or @code{ISMACR}).
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char **} rl_invoking_keyseqs (rl_command_func_t *function)
-Return an array of strings representing the key sequences used to
-invoke @var{function} in the current keymap.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char **} rl_invoking_keyseqs_in_map (rl_command_func_t *function, Keymap map)
-Return an array of strings representing the key sequences used to
-invoke @var{function} in the keymap @var{map}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_function_dumper (int readable)
-Print the readline function names and the key sequences currently
-bound to them to @code{rl_outstream}. If @var{readable} is non-zero,
-the list is formatted in such a way that it can be made part of an
-@code{inputrc} file and re-read.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_list_funmap_names (void)
-Print the names of all bindable Readline functions to @code{rl_outstream}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {const char **} rl_funmap_names (void)
-Return a NULL terminated array of known function names. The array is
-sorted. The array itself is allocated, but not the strings inside. You
-should @code{free()} the array when you are done, but not the pointers.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_add_funmap_entry (const char *name, rl_command_func_t *function)
-Add @var{name} to the list of bindable Readline command names, and make
-@var{function} the function to be called when @var{name} is invoked.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Allowing Undoing
-@subsection Allowing Undoing
-
-Supporting the undo command is a painless thing, and makes your
-functions much more useful. It is certainly easy to try
-something if you know you can undo it.
-
-If your function simply inserts text once, or deletes text once, and
-uses @code{rl_insert_text()} or @code{rl_delete_text()} to do it, then
-undoing is already done for you automatically.
-
-If you do multiple insertions or multiple deletions, or any combination
-of these operations, you should group them together into one operation.
-This is done with @code{rl_begin_undo_group()} and
-@code{rl_end_undo_group()}.
-
-The types of events that can be undone are:
-
-@smallexample
-enum undo_code @{ UNDO_DELETE, UNDO_INSERT, UNDO_BEGIN, UNDO_END @};
-@end smallexample
-
-Notice that @code{UNDO_DELETE} means to insert some text, and
-@code{UNDO_INSERT} means to delete some text. That is, the undo code
-tells what to undo, not how to undo it. @code{UNDO_BEGIN} and
-@code{UNDO_END} are tags added by @code{rl_begin_undo_group()} and
-@code{rl_end_undo_group()}.
-
-@deftypefun int rl_begin_undo_group (void)
-Begins saving undo information in a group construct. The undo
-information usually comes from calls to @code{rl_insert_text()} and
-@code{rl_delete_text()}, but could be the result of calls to
-@code{rl_add_undo()}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_end_undo_group (void)
-Closes the current undo group started with @code{rl_begin_undo_group
-()}. There should be one call to @code{rl_end_undo_group()}
-for each call to @code{rl_begin_undo_group()}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_add_undo (enum undo_code what, int start, int end, char *text)
-Remember how to undo an event (according to @var{what}). The affected
-text runs from @var{start} to @var{end}, and encompasses @var{text}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_free_undo_list (void)
-Free the existing undo list.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_do_undo (void)
-Undo the first thing on the undo list. Returns @code{0} if there was
-nothing to undo, non-zero if something was undone.
-@end deftypefun
-
-Finally, if you neither insert nor delete text, but directly modify the
-existing text (e.g., change its case), call @code{rl_modifying()}
-once, just before you modify the text. You must supply the indices of
-the text range that you are going to modify.
-
-@deftypefun int rl_modifying (int start, int end)
-Tell Readline to save the text between @var{start} and @var{end} as a
-single undo unit. It is assumed that you will subsequently modify
-that text.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Redisplay
-@subsection Redisplay
-
-@deftypefun void rl_redisplay (void)
-Change what's displayed on the screen to reflect the current contents
-of @code{rl_line_buffer}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_forced_update_display (void)
-Force the line to be updated and redisplayed, whether or not
-Readline thinks the screen display is correct.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_on_new_line (void)
-Tell the update functions that we have moved onto a new (empty) line,
-usually after ouputting a newline.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_on_new_line_with_prompt (void)
-Tell the update functions that we have moved onto a new line, with
-@var{rl_prompt} already displayed.
-This could be used by applications that want to output the prompt string
-themselves, but still need Readline to know the prompt string length for
-redisplay.
-It should be used after setting @var{rl_already_prompted}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_reset_line_state (void)
-Reset the display state to a clean state and redisplay the current line
-starting on a new line.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_crlf (void)
-Move the cursor to the start of the next screen line.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_show_char (int c)
-Display character @var{c} on @code{rl_outstream}.
-If Readline has not been set to display meta characters directly, this
-will convert meta characters to a meta-prefixed key sequence.
-This is intended for use by applications which wish to do their own
-redisplay.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_message (const char *, @dots{})
-The arguments are a format string as would be supplied to @code{printf},
-possibly containing conversion specifications such as @samp{%d}, and
-any additional arguments necessary to satisfy the conversion specifications.
-The resulting string is displayed in the @dfn{echo area}. The echo area
-is also used to display numeric arguments and search strings.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_clear_message (void)
-Clear the message in the echo area.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_save_prompt (void)
-Save the local Readline prompt display state in preparation for
-displaying a new message in the message area with @code{rl_message()}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_restore_prompt (void)
-Restore the local Readline prompt display state saved by the most
-recent call to @code{rl_save_prompt}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_expand_prompt (char *prompt)
-Expand any special character sequences in @var{prompt} and set up the
-local Readline prompt redisplay variables.
-This function is called by @code{readline()}. It may also be called to
-expand the primary prompt if the @code{rl_on_new_line_with_prompt()}
-function or @code{rl_already_prompted} variable is used.
-It returns the number of visible characters on the last line of the
-(possibly multi-line) prompt.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_set_prompt (const char *prompt)
-Make Readline use @var{prompt} for subsequent redisplay. This calls
-@code{rl_expand_prompt()} to expand the prompt and sets @code{rl_prompt}
-to the result.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Modifying Text
-@subsection Modifying Text
-
-@deftypefun int rl_insert_text (const char *text)
-Insert @var{text} into the line at the current cursor position.
-Returns the number of characters inserted.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_delete_text (int start, int end)
-Delete the text between @var{start} and @var{end} in the current line.
-Returns the number of characters deleted.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char *} rl_copy_text (int start, int end)
-Return a copy of the text between @var{start} and @var{end} in
-the current line.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_kill_text (int start, int end)
-Copy the text between @var{start} and @var{end} in the current line
-to the kill ring, appending or prepending to the last kill if the
-last command was a kill command. The text is deleted.
-If @var{start} is less than @var{end},
-the text is appended, otherwise prepended. If the last command was
-not a kill, a new kill ring slot is used.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_push_macro_input (char *macro)
-Cause @var{macro} to be inserted into the line, as if it had been invoked
-by a key bound to a macro. Not especially useful; use
-@code{rl_insert_text()} instead.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Character Input
-@subsection Character Input
-
-@deftypefun int rl_read_key (void)
-Return the next character available from Readline's current input stream.
-This handles input inserted into
-the input stream via @var{rl_pending_input} (@pxref{Readline Variables})
-and @code{rl_stuff_char()}, macros, and characters read from the keyboard.
-While waiting for input, this function will call any function assigned to
-the @code{rl_event_hook} variable.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_getc (FILE *stream)
-Return the next character available from @var{stream}, which is assumed to
-be the keyboard.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_stuff_char (int c)
-Insert @var{c} into the Readline input stream. It will be "read"
-before Readline attempts to read characters from the terminal with
-@code{rl_read_key()}. Up to 512 characters may be pushed back.
-@code{rl_stuff_char} returns 1 if the character was successfully inserted;
-0 otherwise.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_execute_next (int c)
-Make @var{c} be the next command to be executed when @code{rl_read_key()}
-is called. This sets @var{rl_pending_input}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_clear_pending_input (void)
-Unset @var{rl_pending_input}, effectively negating the effect of any
-previous call to @code{rl_execute_next()}. This works only if the
-pending input has not already been read with @code{rl_read_key()}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_set_keyboard_input_timeout (int u)
-While waiting for keyboard input in @code{rl_read_key()}, Readline will
-wait for @var{u} microseconds for input before calling any function
-assigned to @code{rl_event_hook}. The default waiting period is
-one-tenth of a second. Returns the old timeout value.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Terminal Management
-@subsection Terminal Management
-
-@deftypefun void rl_prep_terminal (int meta_flag)
-Modify the terminal settings for Readline's use, so @code{readline()}
-can read a single character at a time from the keyboard.
-The @var{meta_flag} argument should be non-zero if Readline should
-read eight-bit input.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_deprep_terminal (void)
-Undo the effects of @code{rl_prep_terminal()}, leaving the terminal in
-the state in which it was before the most recent call to
-@code{rl_prep_terminal()}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_tty_set_default_bindings (Keymap kmap)
-Read the operating system's terminal editing characters (as would be displayed
-by @code{stty}) to their Readline equivalents. The bindings are performed
-in @var{kmap}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_reset_terminal (const char *terminal_name)
-Reinitialize Readline's idea of the terminal settings using
-@var{terminal_name} as the terminal type (e.g., @code{vt100}).
-If @var{terminal_name} is @code{NULL}, the value of the @code{TERM}
-environment variable is used.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Utility Functions
-@subsection Utility Functions
-
-@deftypefun void rl_replace_line (const char *text, int clear_undo)
-Replace the contents of @code{rl_line_buffer} with @var{text}.
-The point and mark are preserved, if possible.
-If @var{clear_undo} is non-zero, the undo list associated with the
-current line is cleared.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_extend_line_buffer (int len)
-Ensure that @code{rl_line_buffer} has enough space to hold @var{len}
-characters, possibly reallocating it if necessary.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_initialize (void)
-Initialize or re-initialize Readline's internal state.
-It's not strictly necessary to call this; @code{readline()} calls it before
-reading any input.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_ding (void)
-Ring the terminal bell, obeying the setting of @code{bell-style}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_alphabetic (int c)
-Return 1 if @var{c} is an alphabetic character.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_display_match_list (char **matches, int len, int max)
-A convenience function for displaying a list of strings in
-columnar format on Readline's output stream. @code{matches} is the list
-of strings, in argv format, such as a list of completion matches.
-@code{len} is the number of strings in @code{matches}, and @code{max}
-is the length of the longest string in @code{matches}. This function uses
-the setting of @code{print-completions-horizontally} to select how the
-matches are displayed (@pxref{Readline Init File Syntax}).
-@end deftypefun
-
-The following are implemented as macros, defined in @code{chardefs.h}.
-Applications should refrain from using them.
-
-@deftypefun int _rl_uppercase_p (int c)
-Return 1 if @var{c} is an uppercase alphabetic character.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int _rl_lowercase_p (int c)
-Return 1 if @var{c} is a lowercase alphabetic character.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int _rl_digit_p (int c)
-Return 1 if @var{c} is a numeric character.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int _rl_to_upper (int c)
-If @var{c} is a lowercase alphabetic character, return the corresponding
-uppercase character.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int _rl_to_lower (int c)
-If @var{c} is an uppercase alphabetic character, return the corresponding
-lowercase character.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int _rl_digit_value (int c)
-If @var{c} is a number, return the value it represents.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Miscellaneous Functions
-@subsection Miscellaneous Functions
-
-@deftypefun int rl_macro_bind (const char *keyseq, const char *macro, Keymap map)
-Bind the key sequence @var{keyseq} to invoke the macro @var{macro}.
-The binding is performed in @var{map}. When @var{keyseq} is invoked, the
-@var{macro} will be inserted into the line. This function is deprecated;
-use @code{rl_generic_bind()} instead.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_macro_dumper (int readable)
-Print the key sequences bound to macros and their values, using
-the current keymap, to @code{rl_outstream}.
-If @var{readable} is non-zero, the list is formatted in such a way
-that it can be made part of an @code{inputrc} file and re-read.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_variable_bind (const char *variable, const char *value)
-Make the Readline variable @var{variable} have @var{value}.
-This behaves as if the readline command
-@samp{set @var{variable} @var{value}} had been executed in an @code{inputrc}
-file (@pxref{Readline Init File Syntax}).
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_variable_dumper (int readable)
-Print the readline variable names and their current values
-to @code{rl_outstream}.
-If @var{readable} is non-zero, the list is formatted in such a way
-that it can be made part of an @code{inputrc} file and re-read.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_set_paren_blink_timeout (int u)
-Set the time interval (in microseconds) that Readline waits when showing
-a balancing character when @code{blink-matching-paren} has been enabled.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char *} rl_get_termcap (const char *cap)
-Retrieve the string value of the termcap capability @var{cap}.
-Readline fetches the termcap entry for the current terminal name and
-uses those capabilities to move around the screen line and perform other
-terminal-specific operations, like erasing a line. Readline does not
-use all of a terminal's capabilities, and this function will return
-values for only those capabilities Readline uses.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Alternate Interface
-@subsection Alternate Interface
-
-An alternate interface is available to plain @code{readline()}. Some
-applications need to interleave keyboard I/O with file, device, or
-window system I/O, typically by using a main loop to @code{select()}
-on various file descriptors. To accomodate this need, readline can
-also be invoked as a `callback' function from an event loop. There
-are functions available to make this easy.
-
-@deftypefun void rl_callback_handler_install (const char *prompt, rl_vcpfunc_t *lhandler)
-Set up the terminal for readline I/O and display the initial
-expanded value of @var{prompt}. Save the value of @var{lhandler} to
-use as a function to call when a complete line of input has been entered.
-The function takes the text of the line as an argument.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_callback_read_char (void)
-Whenever an application determines that keyboard input is available, it
-should call @code{rl_callback_read_char()}, which will read the next
-character from the current input source.
-If that character completes the line, @code{rl_callback_read_char} will
-invoke the @var{lhandler} function saved by @code{rl_callback_handler_install}
-to process the line.
-Before calling the @var{lhandler} function, the terminal settings are
-reset to the values they had before calling
-@code{rl_callback_handler_install}.
-If the @var{lhandler} function returns,
-the terminal settings are modified for Readline's use again.
-@code{EOF} is indicated by calling @var{lhandler} with a
-@code{NULL} line.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_callback_handler_remove (void)
-Restore the terminal to its initial state and remove the line handler.
-This may be called from within a callback as well as independently.
-If the @var{lhandler} installed by @code{rl_callback_handler_install}
-does not exit the program, either this function or the function referred
-to by the value of @code{rl_deprep_term_function} should be called before
-the program exits to reset the terminal settings.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node A Readline Example
-@subsection A Readline Example
-
-Here is a function which changes lowercase characters to their uppercase
-equivalents, and uppercase characters to lowercase. If
-this function was bound to @samp{M-c}, then typing @samp{M-c} would
-change the case of the character under point. Typing @samp{M-1 0 M-c}
-would change the case of the following 10 characters, leaving the cursor on
-the last character changed.
-
-@example
-/* Invert the case of the COUNT following characters. */
-int
-invert_case_line (count, key)
- int count, key;
-@{
- register int start, end, i;
-
- start = rl_point;
-
- if (rl_point >= rl_end)
- return (0);
-
- if (count < 0)
- @{
- direction = -1;
- count = -count;
- @}
- else
- direction = 1;
-
- /* Find the end of the range to modify. */
- end = start + (count * direction);
-
- /* Force it to be within range. */
- if (end > rl_end)
- end = rl_end;
- else if (end < 0)
- end = 0;
-
- if (start == end)
- return (0);
-
- if (start > end)
- @{
- int temp = start;
- start = end;
- end = temp;
- @}
-
- /* Tell readline that we are modifying the line,
- so it will save the undo information. */
- rl_modifying (start, end);
-
- for (i = start; i != end; i++)
- @{
- if (_rl_uppercase_p (rl_line_buffer[i]))
- rl_line_buffer[i] = _rl_to_lower (rl_line_buffer[i]);
- else if (_rl_lowercase_p (rl_line_buffer[i]))
- rl_line_buffer[i] = _rl_to_upper (rl_line_buffer[i]);
- @}
- /* Move point to on top of the last character changed. */
- rl_point = (direction == 1) ? end - 1 : start;
- return (0);
-@}
-@end example
-
-@node Readline Signal Handling
-@section Readline Signal Handling
-
-Signals are asynchronous events sent to a process by the Unix kernel,
-sometimes on behalf of another process. They are intended to indicate
-exceptional events, like a user pressing the interrupt key on his terminal,
-or a network connection being broken. There is a class of signals that can
-be sent to the process currently reading input from the keyboard. Since
-Readline changes the terminal attributes when it is called, it needs to
-perform special processing when such a signal is received in order to
-restore the terminal to a sane state, or provide application writers with
-functions to do so manually.
-
-Readline contains an internal signal handler that is installed for a
-number of signals (@code{SIGINT}, @code{SIGQUIT}, @code{SIGTERM},
-@code{SIGALRM}, @code{SIGTSTP}, @code{SIGTTIN}, and @code{SIGTTOU}).
-When one of these signals is received, the signal handler
-will reset the terminal attributes to those that were in effect before
-@code{readline()} was called, reset the signal handling to what it was
-before @code{readline()} was called, and resend the signal to the calling
-application.
-If and when the calling application's signal handler returns, Readline
-will reinitialize the terminal and continue to accept input.
-When a @code{SIGINT} is received, the Readline signal handler performs
-some additional work, which will cause any partially-entered line to be
-aborted (see the description of @code{rl_free_line_state()} below).
-
-There is an additional Readline signal handler, for @code{SIGWINCH}, which
-the kernel sends to a process whenever the terminal's size changes (for
-example, if a user resizes an @code{xterm}). The Readline @code{SIGWINCH}
-handler updates Readline's internal screen size information, and then calls
-any @code{SIGWINCH} signal handler the calling application has installed.
-Readline calls the application's @code{SIGWINCH} signal handler without
-resetting the terminal to its original state. If the application's signal
-handler does more than update its idea of the terminal size and return (for
-example, a @code{longjmp} back to a main processing loop), it @emph{must}
-call @code{rl_cleanup_after_signal()} (described below), to restore the
-terminal state.
-
-Readline provides two variables that allow application writers to
-control whether or not it will catch certain signals and act on them
-when they are received. It is important that applications change the
-values of these variables only when calling @code{readline()}, not in
-a signal handler, so Readline's internal signal state is not corrupted.
-
-@deftypevar int rl_catch_signals
-If this variable is non-zero, Readline will install signal handlers for
-@code{SIGINT}, @code{SIGQUIT}, @code{SIGTERM}, @code{SIGALRM},
-@code{SIGTSTP}, @code{SIGTTIN}, and @code{SIGTTOU}.
-
-The default value of @code{rl_catch_signals} is 1.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_catch_sigwinch
-If this variable is non-zero, Readline will install a signal handler for
-@code{SIGWINCH}.
-
-The default value of @code{rl_catch_sigwinch} is 1.
-@end deftypevar
-
-If an application does not wish to have Readline catch any signals, or
-to handle signals other than those Readline catches (@code{SIGHUP},
-for example),
-Readline provides convenience functions to do the necessary terminal
-and internal state cleanup upon receipt of a signal.
-
-@deftypefun void rl_cleanup_after_signal (void)
-This function will reset the state of the terminal to what it was before
-@code{readline()} was called, and remove the Readline signal handlers for
-all signals, depending on the values of @code{rl_catch_signals} and
-@code{rl_catch_sigwinch}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_free_line_state (void)
-This will free any partial state associated with the current input line
-(undo information, any partial history entry, any partially-entered
-keyboard macro, and any partially-entered numeric argument). This
-should be called before @code{rl_cleanup_after_signal()}. The
-Readline signal handler for @code{SIGINT} calls this to abort the
-current input line.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_reset_after_signal (void)
-This will reinitialize the terminal and reinstall any Readline signal
-handlers, depending on the values of @code{rl_catch_signals} and
-@code{rl_catch_sigwinch}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-If an application does not wish Readline to catch @code{SIGWINCH}, it may
-call @code{rl_resize_terminal()} or @code{rl_set_screen_size()} to force
-Readline to update its idea of the terminal size when a @code{SIGWINCH}
-is received.
-
-@deftypefun void rl_resize_terminal (void)
-Update Readline's internal screen size by reading values from the kernel.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun void rl_set_screen_size (int rows, int cols)
-Set Readline's idea of the terminal size to @var{rows} rows and
-@var{cols} columns.
-@end deftypefun
-
-If an application does not want to install a @code{SIGWINCH} handler, but
-is still interested in the screen dimensions, Readline's idea of the screen
-size may be queried.
-
-@deftypefun void rl_get_screen_size (int *rows, int *cols)
-Return Readline's idea of the terminal's size in the
-variables pointed to by the arguments.
-@end deftypefun
-
-The following functions install and remove Readline's signal handlers.
-
-@deftypefun int rl_set_signals (void)
-Install Readline's signal handler for @code{SIGINT}, @code{SIGQUIT},
-@code{SIGTERM}, @code{SIGALRM}, @code{SIGTSTP}, @code{SIGTTIN},
-@code{SIGTTOU}, and @code{SIGWINCH}, depending on the values of
-@code{rl_catch_signals} and @code{rl_catch_sigwinch}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_clear_signals (void)
-Remove all of the Readline signal handlers installed by
-@code{rl_set_signals()}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Custom Completers
-@section Custom Completers
-
-Typically, a program that reads commands from the user has a way of
-disambiguating commands and data. If your program is one of these, then
-it can provide completion for commands, data, or both.
-The following sections describe how your program and Readline
-cooperate to provide this service.
-
-@menu
-* How Completing Works:: The logic used to do completion.
-* Completion Functions:: Functions provided by Readline.
-* Completion Variables:: Variables which control completion.
-* A Short Completion Example:: An example of writing completer subroutines.
-@end menu
-
-@node How Completing Works
-@subsection How Completing Works
-
-In order to complete some text, the full list of possible completions
-must be available. That is, it is not possible to accurately
-expand a partial word without knowing all of the possible words
-which make sense in that context. The Readline library provides
-the user interface to completion, and two of the most common
-completion functions: filename and username. For completing other types
-of text, you must write your own completion function. This section
-describes exactly what such functions must do, and provides an example.
-
-There are three major functions used to perform completion:
-
-@enumerate
-@item
-The user-interface function @code{rl_complete()}. This function is
-called with the same arguments as other bindable Readline functions:
-@var{count} and @var{invoking_key}.
-It isolates the word to be completed and calls
-@code{rl_completion_matches()} to generate a list of possible completions.
-It then either lists the possible completions, inserts the possible
-completions, or actually performs the
-completion, depending on which behavior is desired.
-
-@item
-The internal function @code{rl_completion_matches()} uses an
-application-supplied @dfn{generator} function to generate the list of
-possible matches, and then returns the array of these matches.
-The caller should place the address of its generator function in
-@code{rl_completion_entry_function}.
-
-@item
-The generator function is called repeatedly from
-@code{rl_completion_matches()}, returning a string each time. The
-arguments to the generator function are @var{text} and @var{state}.
-@var{text} is the partial word to be completed. @var{state} is zero the
-first time the function is called, allowing the generator to perform
-any necessary initialization, and a positive non-zero integer for
-each subsequent call. The generator function returns
-@code{(char *)NULL} to inform @code{rl_completion_matches()} that there are
-no more possibilities left. Usually the generator function computes the
-list of possible completions when @var{state} is zero, and returns them
-one at a time on subsequent calls. Each string the generator function
-returns as a match must be allocated with @code{malloc()}; Readline
-frees the strings when it has finished with them.
-
-@end enumerate
-
-@deftypefun int rl_complete (int ignore, int invoking_key)
-Complete the word at or before point. You have supplied the function
-that does the initial simple matching selection algorithm (see
-@code{rl_completion_matches()}). The default is to do filename completion.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypevar {rl_compentry_func_t *} rl_completion_entry_function
-This is a pointer to the generator function for
-@code{rl_completion_matches()}.
-If the value of @code{rl_completion_entry_function} is
-@code{NULL} then the default filename generator
-function, @code{rl_filename_completion_function()}, is used.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@node Completion Functions
-@subsection Completion Functions
-
-Here is the complete list of callable completion functions present in
-Readline.
-
-@deftypefun int rl_complete_internal (int what_to_do)
-Complete the word at or before point. @var{what_to_do} says what to do
-with the completion. A value of @samp{?} means list the possible
-completions. @samp{TAB} means do standard completion. @samp{*} means
-insert all of the possible completions. @samp{!} means to display
-all of the possible completions, if there is more than one, as well as
-performing partial completion.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_complete (int ignore, int invoking_key)
-Complete the word at or before point. You have supplied the function
-that does the initial simple matching selection algorithm (see
-@code{rl_completion_matches()} and @code{rl_completion_entry_function}).
-The default is to do filename
-completion. This calls @code{rl_complete_internal()} with an
-argument depending on @var{invoking_key}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_possible_completions (int count, int invoking_key)
-List the possible completions. See description of @code{rl_complete
-()}. This calls @code{rl_complete_internal()} with an argument of
-@samp{?}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_insert_completions (int count, int invoking_key)
-Insert the list of possible completions into the line, deleting the
-partially-completed word. See description of @code{rl_complete()}.
-This calls @code{rl_complete_internal()} with an argument of @samp{*}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun int rl_completion_mode (rl_command_func_t *cfunc)
-Returns the apppriate value to pass to @code{rl_complete_internal()}
-depending on whether @var{cfunc} was called twice in succession and
-the value of the @code{show-all-if-ambiguous} variable.
-Application-specific completion functions may use this function to present
-the same interface as @code{rl_complete()}.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char **} rl_completion_matches (const char *text, rl_compentry_func_t *entry_func)
-Returns an array of strings which is a list of completions for
-@var{text}. If there are no completions, returns @code{NULL}.
-The first entry in the returned array is the substitution for @var{text}.
-The remaining entries are the possible completions. The array is
-terminated with a @code{NULL} pointer.
-
-@var{entry_func} is a function of two args, and returns a
-@code{char *}. The first argument is @var{text}. The second is a
-state argument; it is zero on the first call, and non-zero on subsequent
-calls. @var{entry_func} returns a @code{NULL} pointer to the caller
-when there are no more matches.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char *} rl_filename_completion_function (const char *text, int state)
-A generator function for filename completion in the general case.
-@var{text} is a partial filename.
-The Bash source is a useful reference for writing custom
-completion functions (the Bash completion functions call this and other
-Readline functions).
-@end deftypefun
-
-@deftypefun {char *} rl_username_completion_function (const char *text, int state)
-A completion generator for usernames. @var{text} contains a partial
-username preceded by a random character (usually @samp{~}). As with all
-completion generators, @var{state} is zero on the first call and non-zero
-for subsequent calls.
-@end deftypefun
-
-@node Completion Variables
-@subsection Completion Variables
-
-@deftypevar {rl_compentry_func_t *} rl_completion_entry_function
-A pointer to the generator function for @code{rl_completion_matches()}.
-@code{NULL} means to use @code{rl_filename_completion_function()}, the default
-filename completer.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_completion_func_t *} rl_attempted_completion_function
-A pointer to an alternative function to create matches.
-The function is called with @var{text}, @var{start}, and @var{end}.
-@var{start} and @var{end} are indices in @code{rl_line_buffer} defining
-the boundaries of @var{text}, which is a character string.
-If this function exists and returns @code{NULL}, or if this variable is
-set to @code{NULL}, then @code{rl_complete()} will call the value of
-@code{rl_completion_entry_function} to generate matches, otherwise the
-array of strings returned will be used.
-If this function sets the @code{rl_attempted_completion_over}
-variable to a non-zero value, Readline will not perform its default
-completion even if this function returns no matches.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_quote_func_t *} rl_filename_quoting_function
-A pointer to a function that will quote a filename in an
-application-specific fashion. This is called if filename completion is being
-attempted and one of the characters in @code{rl_filename_quote_characters}
-appears in a completed filename. The function is called with
-@var{text}, @var{match_type}, and @var{quote_pointer}. The @var{text}
-is the filename to be quoted. The @var{match_type} is either
-@code{SINGLE_MATCH}, if there is only one completion match, or
-@code{MULT_MATCH}. Some functions use this to decide whether or not to
-insert a closing quote character. The @var{quote_pointer} is a pointer
-to any opening quote character the user typed. Some functions choose
-to reset this character.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_dequote_func_t *} rl_filename_dequoting_function
-A pointer to a function that will remove application-specific quoting
-characters from a filename before completion is attempted, so those
-characters do not interfere with matching the text against names in
-the filesystem. It is called with @var{text}, the text of the word
-to be dequoted, and @var{quote_char}, which is the quoting character
-that delimits the filename (usually @samp{'} or @samp{"}). If
-@var{quote_char} is zero, the filename was not in an embedded string.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_linebuf_func_t *} rl_char_is_quoted_p
-A pointer to a function to call that determines whether or not a specific
-character in the line buffer is quoted, according to whatever quoting
-mechanism the program calling Readline uses. The function is called with
-two arguments: @var{text}, the text of the line, and @var{index}, the
-index of the character in the line. It is used to decide whether a
-character found in @code{rl_completer_word_break_characters} should be
-used to break words for the completer.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_compignore_func_t *} rl_ignore_some_completions_function
-This function, if defined, is called by the completer when real filename
-completion is done, after all the matching names have been generated.
-It is passed a @code{NULL} terminated array of matches.
-The first element (@code{matches[0]}) is the
-maximal substring common to all matches. This function can
-re-arrange the list of matches as required, but each element deleted
-from the array must be freed.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_icppfunc_t *} rl_directory_completion_hook
-This function, if defined, is allowed to modify the directory portion
-of filenames Readline completes. It is called with the address of a
-string (the current directory name) as an argument, and may modify that string.
-If the string is replaced with a new string, the old value should be freed.
-Any modified directory name should have a trailing slash.
-The modified value will be displayed as part of the completion, replacing
-the directory portion of the pathname the user typed.
-It returns an integer that should be non-zero if the function modifies
-its directory argument.
-It could be used to expand symbolic links or shell variables in pathnames.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {rl_compdisp_func_t *} rl_completion_display_matches_hook
-If non-zero, then this is the address of a function to call when
-completing a word would normally display the list of possible matches.
-This function is called in lieu of Readline displaying the list.
-It takes three arguments:
-(@code{char **}@var{matches}, @code{int} @var{num_matches}, @code{int} @var{max_length})
-where @var{matches} is the array of matching strings,
-@var{num_matches} is the number of strings in that array, and
-@var{max_length} is the length of the longest string in that array.
-Readline provides a convenience function, @code{rl_display_match_list},
-that takes care of doing the display to Readline's output stream. That
-function may be called from this hook.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {const char *} rl_basic_word_break_characters
-The basic list of characters that signal a break between words for the
-completer routine. The default value of this variable is the characters
-which break words for completion in Bash:
-@code{" \t\n\"\\'`@@$><=;|&@{("}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {const char *} rl_basic_quote_characters
-A list of quote characters which can cause a word break.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {const char *} rl_completer_word_break_characters
-The list of characters that signal a break between words for
-@code{rl_complete_internal()}. The default list is the value of
-@code{rl_basic_word_break_characters}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {const char *} rl_completer_quote_characters
-A list of characters which can be used to quote a substring of the line.
-Completion occurs on the entire substring, and within the substring
-@code{rl_completer_word_break_characters} are treated as any other character,
-unless they also appear within this list.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {const char *} rl_filename_quote_characters
-A list of characters that cause a filename to be quoted by the completer
-when they appear in a completed filename. The default is the null string.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {const char *} rl_special_prefixes
-The list of characters that are word break characters, but should be
-left in @var{text} when it is passed to the completion function.
-Programs can use this to help determine what kind of completing to do.
-For instance, Bash sets this variable to "$@@" so that it can complete
-shell variables and hostnames.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_completion_query_items
-Up to this many items will be displayed in response to a
-possible-completions call. After that, we ask the user if she is sure
-she wants to see them all. The default value is 100.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar {int} rl_completion_append_character
-When a single completion alternative matches at the end of the command
-line, this character is appended to the inserted completion text. The
-default is a space character (@samp{ }). Setting this to the null
-character (@samp{\0}) prevents anything being appended automatically.
-This can be changed in custom completion functions to
-provide the ``most sensible word separator character'' according to
-an application-specific command line syntax specification.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_completion_suppress_append
-If non-zero, @var{rl_completion_append_character} is not appended to
-matches at the end of the command line, as described above. It is
-set to 0 before any application-specific completion function is called.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_completion_mark_symlink_dirs
-If non-zero, a slash will be appended to completed filenames that are
-symbolic links to directory names, subject to the value of the
-user-settable @var{mark-directories} variable.
-This variable exists so that application completion functions can
-override the user's global preference (set via the
-@var{mark-symlinked-directories} Readline variable) if appropriate.
-This variable is set to the user's preference before any
-application completion function is called, so unless that function
-modifies the value, the user's preferences are honored.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_ignore_completion_duplicates
-If non-zero, then duplicates in the matches are removed.
-The default is 1.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_filename_completion_desired
-Non-zero means that the results of the matches are to be treated as
-filenames. This is @emph{always} zero on entry, and can only be changed
-within a completion entry generator function. If it is set to a non-zero
-value, directory names have a slash appended and Readline attempts to
-quote completed filenames if they contain any characters in
-@code{rl_filename_quote_characters} and @code{rl_filename_quoting_desired}
-is set to a non-zero value.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_filename_quoting_desired
-Non-zero means that the results of the matches are to be quoted using
-double quotes (or an application-specific quoting mechanism) if the
-completed filename contains any characters in
-@code{rl_filename_quote_chars}. This is @emph{always} non-zero
-on entry, and can only be changed within a completion entry generator
-function. The quoting is effected via a call to the function pointed to
-by @code{rl_filename_quoting_function}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_attempted_completion_over
-If an application-specific completion function assigned to
-@code{rl_attempted_completion_function} sets this variable to a non-zero
-value, Readline will not perform its default filename completion even
-if the application's completion function returns no matches.
-It should be set only by an application's completion function.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_completion_type
-Set to a character describing the type of completion Readline is currently
-attempting; see the description of @code{rl_complete_internal()}
-(@pxref{Completion Functions}) for the list of characters.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@deftypevar int rl_inhibit_completion
-If this variable is non-zero, completion is inhibited. The completion
-character will be inserted as any other bound to @code{self-insert}.
-@end deftypevar
-
-@node A Short Completion Example
-@subsection A Short Completion Example
-
-Here is a small application demonstrating the use of the GNU Readline
-library. It is called @code{fileman}, and the source code resides in
-@file{examples/fileman.c}. This sample application provides
-completion of command names, line editing features, and access to the
-history list.
-
-@page
-@smallexample
-/* fileman.c -- A tiny application which demonstrates how to use the
- GNU Readline library. This application interactively allows users
- to manipulate files and their modes. */
-
-#include <stdio.h>
-#include <sys/types.h>
-#include <sys/file.h>
-#include <sys/stat.h>
-#include <sys/errno.h>
-
-#include <readline/readline.h>
-#include <readline/history.h>
-
-extern char *xmalloc ();
-
-/* The names of functions that actually do the manipulation. */
-int com_list __P((char *));
-int com_view __P((char *));
-int com_rename __P((char *));
-int com_stat __P((char *));
-int com_pwd __P((char *));
-int com_delete __P((char *));
-int com_help __P((char *));
-int com_cd __P((char *));
-int com_quit __P((char *));
-
-/* A structure which contains information on the commands this program
- can understand. */
-
-typedef struct @{
- char *name; /* User printable name of the function. */
- rl_icpfunc_t *func; /* Function to call to do the job. */
- char *doc; /* Documentation for this function. */
-@} COMMAND;
-
-COMMAND commands[] = @{
- @{ "cd", com_cd, "Change to directory DIR" @},
- @{ "delete", com_delete, "Delete FILE" @},
- @{ "help", com_help, "Display this text" @},
- @{ "?", com_help, "Synonym for `help'" @},
- @{ "list", com_list, "List files in DIR" @},
- @{ "ls", com_list, "Synonym for `list'" @},
- @{ "pwd", com_pwd, "Print the current working directory" @},
- @{ "quit", com_quit, "Quit using Fileman" @},
- @{ "rename", com_rename, "Rename FILE to NEWNAME" @},
- @{ "stat", com_stat, "Print out statistics on FILE" @},
- @{ "view", com_view, "View the contents of FILE" @},
- @{ (char *)NULL, (rl_icpfunc_t *)NULL, (char *)NULL @}
-@};
-
-/* Forward declarations. */
-char *stripwhite ();
-COMMAND *find_command ();
-
-/* The name of this program, as taken from argv[0]. */
-char *progname;
-
-/* When non-zero, this means the user is done using this program. */
-int done;
-
-char *
-dupstr (s)
- int s;
-@{
- char *r;
-
- r = xmalloc (strlen (s) + 1);
- strcpy (r, s);
- return (r);
-@}
-
-main (argc, argv)
- int argc;
- char **argv;
-@{
- char *line, *s;
-
- progname = argv[0];
-
- initialize_readline (); /* Bind our completer. */
-
- /* Loop reading and executing lines until the user quits. */
- for ( ; done == 0; )
- @{
- line = readline ("FileMan: ");
-
- if (!line)
- break;
-
- /* Remove leading and trailing whitespace from the line.
- Then, if there is anything left, add it to the history list
- and execute it. */
- s = stripwhite (line);
-
- if (*s)
- @{
- add_history (s);
- execute_line (s);
- @}
-
- free (line);
- @}
- exit (0);
-@}
-
-/* Execute a command line. */
-int
-execute_line (line)
- char *line;
-@{
- register int i;
- COMMAND *command;
- char *word;
-
- /* Isolate the command word. */
- i = 0;
- while (line[i] && whitespace (line[i]))
- i++;
- word = line + i;
-
- while (line[i] && !whitespace (line[i]))
- i++;
-
- if (line[i])
- line[i++] = '\0';
-
- command = find_command (word);
-
- if (!command)
- @{
- fprintf (stderr, "%s: No such command for FileMan.\n", word);
- return (-1);
- @}
-
- /* Get argument to command, if any. */
- while (whitespace (line[i]))
- i++;
-
- word = line + i;
-
- /* Call the function. */
- return ((*(command->func)) (word));
-@}
-
-/* Look up NAME as the name of a command, and return a pointer to that
- command. Return a NULL pointer if NAME isn't a command name. */
-COMMAND *
-find_command (name)
- char *name;
-@{
- register int i;
-
- for (i = 0; commands[i].name; i++)
- if (strcmp (name, commands[i].name) == 0)
- return (&commands[i]);
-
- return ((COMMAND *)NULL);
-@}
-
-/* Strip whitespace from the start and end of STRING. Return a pointer
- into STRING. */
-char *
-stripwhite (string)
- char *string;
-@{
- register char *s, *t;
-
- for (s = string; whitespace (*s); s++)
- ;
-
- if (*s == 0)
- return (s);
-
- t = s + strlen (s) - 1;
- while (t > s && whitespace (*t))
- t--;
- *++t = '\0';
-
- return s;
-@}
-
-/* **************************************************************** */
-/* */
-/* Interface to Readline Completion */
-/* */
-/* **************************************************************** */
-
-char *command_generator __P((const char *, int));
-char **fileman_completion __P((const char *, int, int));
-
-/* Tell the GNU Readline library how to complete. We want to try to
- complete on command names if this is the first word in the line, or
- on filenames if not. */
-initialize_readline ()
-@{
- /* Allow conditional parsing of the ~/.inputrc file. */
- rl_readline_name = "FileMan";
-
- /* Tell the completer that we want a crack first. */
- rl_attempted_completion_function = fileman_completion;
-@}
-
-/* Attempt to complete on the contents of TEXT. START and END
- bound the region of rl_line_buffer that contains the word to
- complete. TEXT is the word to complete. We can use the entire
- contents of rl_line_buffer in case we want to do some simple
- parsing. Returnthe array of matches, or NULL if there aren't any. */
-char **
-fileman_completion (text, start, end)
- const char *text;
- int start, end;
-@{
- char **matches;
-
- matches = (char **)NULL;
-
- /* If this word is at the start of the line, then it is a command
- to complete. Otherwise it is the name of a file in the current
- directory. */
- if (start == 0)
- matches = rl_completion_matches (text, command_generator);
-
- return (matches);
-@}
-
-/* Generator function for command completion. STATE lets us
- know whether to start from scratch; without any state
- (i.e. STATE == 0), then we start at the top of the list. */
-char *
-command_generator (text, state)
- const char *text;
- int state;
-@{
- static int list_index, len;
- char *name;
-
- /* If this is a new word to complete, initialize now. This
- includes saving the length of TEXT for efficiency, and
- initializing the index variable to 0. */
- if (!state)
- @{
- list_index = 0;
- len = strlen (text);
- @}
-
- /* Return the next name which partially matches from the
- command list. */
- while (name = commands[list_index].name)
- @{
- list_index++;
-
- if (strncmp (name, text, len) == 0)
- return (dupstr(name));
- @}
-
- /* If no names matched, then return NULL. */
- return ((char *)NULL);
-@}
-
-/* **************************************************************** */
-/* */
-/* FileMan Commands */
-/* */
-/* **************************************************************** */
-
-/* String to pass to system (). This is for the LIST, VIEW and RENAME
- commands. */
-static char syscom[1024];
-
-/* List the file(s) named in arg. */
-com_list (arg)
- char *arg;
-@{
- if (!arg)
- arg = "";
-
- sprintf (syscom, "ls -FClg %s", arg);
- return (system (syscom));
-@}
-
-com_view (arg)
- char *arg;
-@{
- if (!valid_argument ("view", arg))
- return 1;
-
- sprintf (syscom, "more %s", arg);
- return (system (syscom));
-@}
-
-com_rename (arg)
- char *arg;
-@{
- too_dangerous ("rename");
- return (1);
-@}
-
-com_stat (arg)
- char *arg;
-@{
- struct stat finfo;
-
- if (!valid_argument ("stat", arg))
- return (1);
-
- if (stat (arg, &finfo) == -1)
- @{
- perror (arg);
- return (1);
- @}
-
- printf ("Statistics for `%s':\n", arg);
-
- printf ("%s has %d link%s, and is %d byte%s in length.\n", arg,
- finfo.st_nlink,
- (finfo.st_nlink == 1) ? "" : "s",
- finfo.st_size,
- (finfo.st_size == 1) ? "" : "s");
- printf ("Inode Last Change at: %s", ctime (&finfo.st_ctime));
- printf (" Last access at: %s", ctime (&finfo.st_atime));
- printf (" Last modified at: %s", ctime (&finfo.st_mtime));
- return (0);
-@}
-
-com_delete (arg)
- char *arg;
-@{
- too_dangerous ("delete");
- return (1);
-@}
-
-/* Print out help for ARG, or for all of the commands if ARG is
- not present. */
-com_help (arg)
- char *arg;
-@{
- register int i;
- int printed = 0;
-
- for (i = 0; commands[i].name; i++)
- @{
- if (!*arg || (strcmp (arg, commands[i].name) == 0))
- @{
- printf ("%s\t\t%s.\n", commands[i].name, commands[i].doc);
- printed++;
- @}
- @}
-
- if (!printed)
- @{
- printf ("No commands match `%s'. Possibilties are:\n", arg);
-
- for (i = 0; commands[i].name; i++)
- @{
- /* Print in six columns. */
- if (printed == 6)
- @{
- printed = 0;
- printf ("\n");
- @}
-
- printf ("%s\t", commands[i].name);
- printed++;
- @}
-
- if (printed)
- printf ("\n");
- @}
- return (0);
-@}
-
-/* Change to the directory ARG. */
-com_cd (arg)
- char *arg;
-@{
- if (chdir (arg) == -1)
- @{
- perror (arg);
- return 1;
- @}
-
- com_pwd ("");
- return (0);
-@}
-
-/* Print out the current working directory. */
-com_pwd (ignore)
- char *ignore;
-@{
- char dir[1024], *s;
-
- s = getcwd (dir, sizeof(dir) - 1);
- if (s == 0)
- @{
- printf ("Error getting pwd: %s\n", dir);
- return 1;
- @}
-
- printf ("Current directory is %s\n", dir);
- return 0;
-@}
-
-/* The user wishes to quit using this program. Just set DONE
- non-zero. */
-com_quit (arg)
- char *arg;
-@{
- done = 1;
- return (0);
-@}
-
-/* Function which tells you that you can't do this. */
-too_dangerous (caller)
- char *caller;
-@{
- fprintf (stderr,
- "%s: Too dangerous for me to distribute.\n"
- caller);
- fprintf (stderr, "Write it yourself.\n");
-@}
-
-/* Return non-zero if ARG is a valid argument for CALLER,
- else print an error message and return zero. */
-int
-valid_argument (caller, arg)
- char *caller, *arg;
-@{
- if (!arg || !*arg)
- @{
- fprintf (stderr, "%s: Argument required.\n", caller);
- return (0);
- @}
-
- return (1);
-@}
-@end smallexample
diff --git a/contrib/libreadline/doc/rluser.texinfo b/contrib/libreadline/doc/rluser.texinfo
deleted file mode 100644
index 94f851e67f29..000000000000
--- a/contrib/libreadline/doc/rluser.texinfo
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,1796 +0,0 @@
-@comment %**start of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-@setfilename rluser.info
-@comment %**end of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-@setchapternewpage odd
-
-@ignore
-This file documents the end user interface to the GNU command line
-editing features. It is to be an appendix to manuals for programs which
-use these features. There is a document entitled "readline.texinfo"
-which contains both end-user and programmer documentation for the
-GNU Readline Library.
-
-Copyright (C) 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-Authored by Brian Fox and Chet Ramey.
-
-Permission is granted to process this file through Tex and print the
-results, provided the printed document carries copying permission notice
-identical to this one except for the removal of this paragraph (this
-paragraph not being relevant to the printed manual).
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this manual
-provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are preserved on
-all copies.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided also that the
-GNU Copyright statement is available to the distributee, and provided that
-the entire resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a
-permission notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions.
-@end ignore
-
-@comment If you are including this manual as an appendix, then set the
-@comment variable readline-appendix.
-
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-@defcodeindex bt
-@end ifclear
-
-@node Command Line Editing
-@chapter Command Line Editing
-
-This chapter describes the basic features of the @sc{gnu}
-command line editing interface.
-@ifset BashFeatures
-Command line editing is provided by the Readline library, which is
-used by several different programs, including Bash.
-@end ifset
-
-@menu
-* Introduction and Notation:: Notation used in this text.
-* Readline Interaction:: The minimum set of commands for editing a line.
-* Readline Init File:: Customizing Readline from a user's view.
-* Bindable Readline Commands:: A description of most of the Readline commands
- available for binding
-* Readline vi Mode:: A short description of how to make Readline
- behave like the vi editor.
-@ifset BashFeatures
-* Programmable Completion:: How to specify the possible completions for
- a specific command.
-* Programmable Completion Builtins:: Builtin commands to specify how to
- complete arguments for a particular command.
-@end ifset
-@end menu
-
-@node Introduction and Notation
-@section Introduction to Line Editing
-
-The following paragraphs describe the notation used to represent
-keystrokes.
-
-The text @kbd{C-k} is read as `Control-K' and describes the character
-produced when the @key{k} key is pressed while the Control key
-is depressed.
-
-The text @kbd{M-k} is read as `Meta-K' and describes the character
-produced when the Meta key (if you have one) is depressed, and the @key{k}
-key is pressed.
-The Meta key is labeled @key{ALT} on many keyboards.
-On keyboards with two keys labeled @key{ALT} (usually to either side of
-the space bar), the @key{ALT} on the left side is generally set to
-work as a Meta key.
-The @key{ALT} key on the right may also be configured to work as a
-Meta key or may be configured as some other modifier, such as a
-Compose key for typing accented characters.
-
-If you do not have a Meta or @key{ALT} key, or another key working as
-a Meta key, the identical keystroke can be generated by typing @key{ESC}
-@emph{first}, and then typing @key{k}.
-Either process is known as @dfn{metafying} the @key{k} key.
-
-The text @kbd{M-C-k} is read as `Meta-Control-k' and describes the
-character produced by @dfn{metafying} @kbd{C-k}.
-
-In addition, several keys have their own names. Specifically,
-@key{DEL}, @key{ESC}, @key{LFD}, @key{SPC}, @key{RET}, and @key{TAB} all
-stand for themselves when seen in this text, or in an init file
-(@pxref{Readline Init File}).
-If your keyboard lacks a @key{LFD} key, typing @key{C-j} will
-produce the desired character.
-The @key{RET} key may be labeled @key{Return} or @key{Enter} on
-some keyboards.
-
-@node Readline Interaction
-@section Readline Interaction
-@cindex interaction, readline
-
-Often during an interactive session you type in a long line of text,
-only to notice that the first word on the line is misspelled. The
-Readline library gives you a set of commands for manipulating the text
-as you type it in, allowing you to just fix your typo, and not forcing
-you to retype the majority of the line. Using these editing commands,
-you move the cursor to the place that needs correction, and delete or
-insert the text of the corrections. Then, when you are satisfied with
-the line, you simply press @key{RET}. You do not have to be at the
-end of the line to press @key{RET}; the entire line is accepted
-regardless of the location of the cursor within the line.
-
-@menu
-* Readline Bare Essentials:: The least you need to know about Readline.
-* Readline Movement Commands:: Moving about the input line.
-* Readline Killing Commands:: How to delete text, and how to get it back!
-* Readline Arguments:: Giving numeric arguments to commands.
-* Searching:: Searching through previous lines.
-@end menu
-
-@node Readline Bare Essentials
-@subsection Readline Bare Essentials
-@cindex notation, readline
-@cindex command editing
-@cindex editing command lines
-
-In order to enter characters into the line, simply type them. The typed
-character appears where the cursor was, and then the cursor moves one
-space to the right. If you mistype a character, you can use your
-erase character to back up and delete the mistyped character.
-
-Sometimes you may mistype a character, and
-not notice the error until you have typed several other characters. In
-that case, you can type @kbd{C-b} to move the cursor to the left, and then
-correct your mistake. Afterwards, you can move the cursor to the right
-with @kbd{C-f}.
-
-When you add text in the middle of a line, you will notice that characters
-to the right of the cursor are `pushed over' to make room for the text
-that you have inserted. Likewise, when you delete text behind the cursor,
-characters to the right of the cursor are `pulled back' to fill in the
-blank space created by the removal of the text. A list of the bare
-essentials for editing the text of an input line follows.
-
-@table @asis
-@item @kbd{C-b}
-Move back one character.
-@item @kbd{C-f}
-Move forward one character.
-@item @key{DEL} or @key{Backspace}
-Delete the character to the left of the cursor.
-@item @kbd{C-d}
-Delete the character underneath the cursor.
-@item @w{Printing characters}
-Insert the character into the line at the cursor.
-@item @kbd{C-_} or @kbd{C-x C-u}
-Undo the last editing command. You can undo all the way back to an
-empty line.
-@end table
-
-@noindent
-(Depending on your configuration, the @key{Backspace} key be set to
-delete the character to the left of the cursor and the @key{DEL} key set
-to delete the character underneath the cursor, like @kbd{C-d}, rather
-than the character to the left of the cursor.)
-
-@node Readline Movement Commands
-@subsection Readline Movement Commands
-
-
-The above table describes the most basic keystrokes that you need
-in order to do editing of the input line. For your convenience, many
-other commands have been added in addition to @kbd{C-b}, @kbd{C-f},
-@kbd{C-d}, and @key{DEL}. Here are some commands for moving more rapidly
-about the line.
-
-@table @kbd
-@item C-a
-Move to the start of the line.
-@item C-e
-Move to the end of the line.
-@item M-f
-Move forward a word, where a word is composed of letters and digits.
-@item M-b
-Move backward a word.
-@item C-l
-Clear the screen, reprinting the current line at the top.
-@end table
-
-Notice how @kbd{C-f} moves forward a character, while @kbd{M-f} moves
-forward a word. It is a loose convention that control keystrokes
-operate on characters while meta keystrokes operate on words.
-
-@node Readline Killing Commands
-@subsection Readline Killing Commands
-
-@cindex killing text
-@cindex yanking text
-
-@dfn{Killing} text means to delete the text from the line, but to save
-it away for later use, usually by @dfn{yanking} (re-inserting)
-it back into the line.
-(`Cut' and `paste' are more recent jargon for `kill' and `yank'.)
-
-If the description for a command says that it `kills' text, then you can
-be sure that you can get the text back in a different (or the same)
-place later.
-
-When you use a kill command, the text is saved in a @dfn{kill-ring}.
-Any number of consecutive kills save all of the killed text together, so
-that when you yank it back, you get it all. The kill
-ring is not line specific; the text that you killed on a previously
-typed line is available to be yanked back later, when you are typing
-another line.
-@cindex kill ring
-
-Here is the list of commands for killing text.
-
-@table @kbd
-@item C-k
-Kill the text from the current cursor position to the end of the line.
-
-@item M-d
-Kill from the cursor to the end of the current word, or, if between
-words, to the end of the next word.
-Word boundaries are the same as those used by @kbd{M-f}.
-
-@item M-@key{DEL}
-Kill from the cursor the start of the current word, or, if between
-words, to the start of the previous word.
-Word boundaries are the same as those used by @kbd{M-b}.
-
-@item C-w
-Kill from the cursor to the previous whitespace. This is different than
-@kbd{M-@key{DEL}} because the word boundaries differ.
-
-@end table
-
-Here is how to @dfn{yank} the text back into the line. Yanking
-means to copy the most-recently-killed text from the kill buffer.
-
-@table @kbd
-@item C-y
-Yank the most recently killed text back into the buffer at the cursor.
-
-@item M-y
-Rotate the kill-ring, and yank the new top. You can only do this if
-the prior command is @kbd{C-y} or @kbd{M-y}.
-@end table
-
-@node Readline Arguments
-@subsection Readline Arguments
-
-You can pass numeric arguments to Readline commands. Sometimes the
-argument acts as a repeat count, other times it is the @i{sign} of the
-argument that is significant. If you pass a negative argument to a
-command which normally acts in a forward direction, that command will
-act in a backward direction. For example, to kill text back to the
-start of the line, you might type @samp{M-- C-k}.
-
-The general way to pass numeric arguments to a command is to type meta
-digits before the command. If the first `digit' typed is a minus
-sign (@samp{-}), then the sign of the argument will be negative. Once
-you have typed one meta digit to get the argument started, you can type
-the remainder of the digits, and then the command. For example, to give
-the @kbd{C-d} command an argument of 10, you could type @samp{M-1 0 C-d},
-which will delete the next ten characters on the input line.
-
-@node Searching
-@subsection Searching for Commands in the History
-
-Readline provides commands for searching through the command history
-@ifset BashFeatures
-(@pxref{Bash History Facilities})
-@end ifset
-for lines containing a specified string.
-There are two search modes: @dfn{incremental} and @dfn{non-incremental}.
-
-Incremental searches begin before the user has finished typing the
-search string.
-As each character of the search string is typed, Readline displays
-the next entry from the history matching the string typed so far.
-An incremental search requires only as many characters as needed to
-find the desired history entry.
-To search backward in the history for a particular string, type
-@kbd{C-r}. Typing @kbd{C-s} searches forward through the history.
-The characters present in the value of the @code{isearch-terminators} variable
-are used to terminate an incremental search.
-If that variable has not been assigned a value, the @key{ESC} and
-@kbd{C-J} characters will terminate an incremental search.
-@kbd{C-g} will abort an incremental search and restore the original line.
-When the search is terminated, the history entry containing the
-search string becomes the current line.
-
-To find other matching entries in the history list, type @kbd{C-r} or
-@kbd{C-s} as appropriate.
-This will search backward or forward in the history for the next
-entry matching the search string typed so far.
-Any other key sequence bound to a Readline command will terminate
-the search and execute that command.
-For instance, a @key{RET} will terminate the search and accept
-the line, thereby executing the command from the history list.
-A movement command will terminate the search, make the last line found
-the current line, and begin editing.
-
-Readline remembers the last incremental search string. If two
-@kbd{C-r}s are typed without any intervening characters defining a new
-search string, any remembered search string is used.
-
-Non-incremental searches read the entire search string before starting
-to search for matching history lines. The search string may be
-typed by the user or be part of the contents of the current line.
-
-@node Readline Init File
-@section Readline Init File
-@cindex initialization file, readline
-
-Although the Readline library comes with a set of Emacs-like
-keybindings installed by default, it is possible to use a different set
-of keybindings.
-Any user can customize programs that use Readline by putting
-commands in an @dfn{inputrc} file, conventionally in his home directory.
-The name of this
-@ifset BashFeatures
-file is taken from the value of the shell variable @env{INPUTRC}. If
-@end ifset
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-file is taken from the value of the environment variable @env{INPUTRC}. If
-@end ifclear
-that variable is unset, the default is @file{~/.inputrc}.
-
-When a program which uses the Readline library starts up, the
-init file is read, and the key bindings are set.
-
-In addition, the @code{C-x C-r} command re-reads this init file, thus
-incorporating any changes that you might have made to it.
-
-@menu
-* Readline Init File Syntax:: Syntax for the commands in the inputrc file.
-
-* Conditional Init Constructs:: Conditional key bindings in the inputrc file.
-
-* Sample Init File:: An example inputrc file.
-@end menu
-
-@node Readline Init File Syntax
-@subsection Readline Init File Syntax
-
-There are only a few basic constructs allowed in the
-Readline init file. Blank lines are ignored.
-Lines beginning with a @samp{#} are comments.
-Lines beginning with a @samp{$} indicate conditional
-constructs (@pxref{Conditional Init Constructs}). Other lines
-denote variable settings and key bindings.
-
-@table @asis
-@item Variable Settings
-You can modify the run-time behavior of Readline by
-altering the values of variables in Readline
-using the @code{set} command within the init file.
-The syntax is simple:
-
-@example
-set @var{variable} @var{value}
-@end example
-
-@noindent
-Here, for example, is how to
-change from the default Emacs-like key binding to use
-@code{vi} line editing commands:
-
-@example
-set editing-mode vi
-@end example
-
-Variable names and values, where appropriate, are recognized without regard
-to case.
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-The @w{@code{bind -V}} command lists the current Readline variable names
-and values. @xref{Bash Builtins}.
-@end ifset
-
-A great deal of run-time behavior is changeable with the following
-variables.
-
-@cindex variables, readline
-@table @code
-
-@item bell-style
-@vindex bell-style
-Controls what happens when Readline wants to ring the terminal bell.
-If set to @samp{none}, Readline never rings the bell. If set to
-@samp{visible}, Readline uses a visible bell if one is available.
-If set to @samp{audible} (the default), Readline attempts to ring
-the terminal's bell.
-
-@item comment-begin
-@vindex comment-begin
-The string to insert at the beginning of the line when the
-@code{insert-comment} command is executed. The default value
-is @code{"#"}.
-
-@item completion-ignore-case
-If set to @samp{on}, Readline performs filename matching and completion
-in a case-insensitive fashion.
-The default value is @samp{off}.
-
-@item completion-query-items
-@vindex completion-query-items
-The number of possible completions that determines when the user is
-asked whether he wants to see the list of possibilities. If the
-number of possible completions is greater than this value,
-Readline will ask the user whether or not he wishes to view
-them; otherwise, they are simply listed.
-This variable must be set to an integer value greater than or equal to 0.
-The default limit is @code{100}.
-
-@item convert-meta
-@vindex convert-meta
-If set to @samp{on}, Readline will convert characters with the
-eighth bit set to an @sc{ascii} key sequence by stripping the eighth
-bit and prefixing an @key{ESC} character, converting them to a
-meta-prefixed key sequence. The default value is @samp{on}.
-
-@item disable-completion
-@vindex disable-completion
-If set to @samp{On}, Readline will inhibit word completion.
-Completion characters will be inserted into the line as if they had
-been mapped to @code{self-insert}. The default is @samp{off}.
-
-@item editing-mode
-@vindex editing-mode
-The @code{editing-mode} variable controls which default set of
-key bindings is used. By default, Readline starts up in Emacs editing
-mode, where the keystrokes are most similar to Emacs. This variable can be
-set to either @samp{emacs} or @samp{vi}.
-
-@item enable-keypad
-@vindex enable-keypad
-When set to @samp{on}, Readline will try to enable the application
-keypad when it is called. Some systems need this to enable the
-arrow keys. The default is @samp{off}.
-
-@item expand-tilde
-@vindex expand-tilde
-If set to @samp{on}, tilde expansion is performed when Readline
-attempts word completion. The default is @samp{off}.
-
-@vindex history-preserve-point
-If set to @samp{on}, the history code attempts to place point at the
-same location on each history line retrived with @code{previous-history}
-or @code{next-history}.
-
-@item horizontal-scroll-mode
-@vindex horizontal-scroll-mode
-This variable can be set to either @samp{on} or @samp{off}. Setting it
-to @samp{on} means that the text of the lines being edited will scroll
-horizontally on a single screen line when they are longer than the width
-of the screen, instead of wrapping onto a new screen line. By default,
-this variable is set to @samp{off}.
-
-@item input-meta
-@vindex input-meta
-@vindex meta-flag
-If set to @samp{on}, Readline will enable eight-bit input (it
-will not clear the eighth bit in the characters it reads),
-regardless of what the terminal claims it can support. The
-default value is @samp{off}. The name @code{meta-flag} is a
-synonym for this variable.
-
-@item isearch-terminators
-@vindex isearch-terminators
-The string of characters that should terminate an incremental search without
-subsequently executing the character as a command (@pxref{Searching}).
-If this variable has not been given a value, the characters @key{ESC} and
-@kbd{C-J} will terminate an incremental search.
-
-@item keymap
-@vindex keymap
-Sets Readline's idea of the current keymap for key binding commands.
-Acceptable @code{keymap} names are
-@code{emacs},
-@code{emacs-standard},
-@code{emacs-meta},
-@code{emacs-ctlx},
-@code{vi},
-@code{vi-move},
-@code{vi-command}, and
-@code{vi-insert}.
-@code{vi} is equivalent to @code{vi-command}; @code{emacs} is
-equivalent to @code{emacs-standard}. The default value is @code{emacs}.
-The value of the @code{editing-mode} variable also affects the
-default keymap.
-
-@item mark-directories
-If set to @samp{on}, completed directory names have a slash
-appended. The default is @samp{on}.
-
-@item mark-modified-lines
-@vindex mark-modified-lines
-This variable, when set to @samp{on}, causes Readline to display an
-asterisk (@samp{*}) at the start of history lines which have been modified.
-This variable is @samp{off} by default.
-
-@item mark-symlinked-directories
-@vindex mark-symlinked-directories
-If set to @samp{on}, completed names which are symbolic links
-to directories have a slash appended (subject to the value of
-@code{mark-directories}).
-The default is @samp{off}.
-
-@item match-hidden-files
-@vindex match-hidden-files
-This variable, when set to @samp{on}, causes Readline to match files whose
-names begin with a @samp{.} (hidden files) when performing filename
-completion, unless the leading @samp{.} is
-supplied by the user in the filename to be completed.
-This variable is @samp{on} by default.
-
-@item output-meta
-@vindex output-meta
-If set to @samp{on}, Readline will display characters with the
-eighth bit set directly rather than as a meta-prefixed escape
-sequence. The default is @samp{off}.
-
-@item page-completions
-@vindex page-completions
-If set to @samp{on}, Readline uses an internal @code{more}-like pager
-to display a screenful of possible completions at a time.
-This variable is @samp{on} by default.
-
-@item print-completions-horizontally
-If set to @samp{on}, Readline will display completions with matches
-sorted horizontally in alphabetical order, rather than down the screen.
-The default is @samp{off}.
-
-@item show-all-if-ambiguous
-@vindex show-all-if-ambiguous
-This alters the default behavior of the completion functions. If
-set to @samp{on},
-words which have more than one possible completion cause the
-matches to be listed immediately instead of ringing the bell.
-The default value is @samp{off}.
-
-@item visible-stats
-@vindex visible-stats
-If set to @samp{on}, a character denoting a file's type
-is appended to the filename when listing possible
-completions. The default is @samp{off}.
-
-@end table
-
-@item Key Bindings
-The syntax for controlling key bindings in the init file is
-simple. First you need to find the name of the command that you
-want to change. The following sections contain tables of the command
-name, the default keybinding, if any, and a short description of what
-the command does.
-
-Once you know the name of the command, simply place on a line
-in the init file the name of the key
-you wish to bind the command to, a colon, and then the name of the
-command. The name of the key
-can be expressed in different ways, depending on what you find most
-comfortable.
-
-In addition to command names, readline allows keys to be bound
-to a string that is inserted when the key is pressed (a @var{macro}).
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-The @w{@code{bind -p}} command displays Readline function names and
-bindings in a format that can put directly into an initialization file.
-@xref{Bash Builtins}.
-@end ifset
-
-@table @asis
-@item @w{@var{keyname}: @var{function-name} or @var{macro}}
-@var{keyname} is the name of a key spelled out in English. For example:
-@example
-Control-u: universal-argument
-Meta-Rubout: backward-kill-word
-Control-o: "> output"
-@end example
-
-In the above example, @kbd{C-u} is bound to the function
-@code{universal-argument},
-@kbd{M-DEL} is bound to the function @code{backward-kill-word}, and
-@kbd{C-o} is bound to run the macro
-expressed on the right hand side (that is, to insert the text
-@samp{> output} into the line).
-
-A number of symbolic character names are recognized while
-processing this key binding syntax:
-@var{DEL},
-@var{ESC},
-@var{ESCAPE},
-@var{LFD},
-@var{NEWLINE},
-@var{RET},
-@var{RETURN},
-@var{RUBOUT},
-@var{SPACE},
-@var{SPC},
-and
-@var{TAB}.
-
-@item @w{"@var{keyseq}": @var{function-name} or @var{macro}}
-@var{keyseq} differs from @var{keyname} above in that strings
-denoting an entire key sequence can be specified, by placing
-the key sequence in double quotes. Some @sc{gnu} Emacs style key
-escapes can be used, as in the following example, but the
-special character names are not recognized.
-
-@example
-"\C-u": universal-argument
-"\C-x\C-r": re-read-init-file
-"\e[11~": "Function Key 1"
-@end example
-
-In the above example, @kbd{C-u} is again bound to the function
-@code{universal-argument} (just as it was in the first example),
-@samp{@kbd{C-x} @kbd{C-r}} is bound to the function @code{re-read-init-file},
-and @samp{@key{ESC} @key{[} @key{1} @key{1} @key{~}} is bound to insert
-the text @samp{Function Key 1}.
-
-@end table
-
-The following @sc{gnu} Emacs style escape sequences are available when
-specifying key sequences:
-
-@table @code
-@item @kbd{\C-}
-control prefix
-@item @kbd{\M-}
-meta prefix
-@item @kbd{\e}
-an escape character
-@item @kbd{\\}
-backslash
-@item @kbd{\"}
-@key{"}, a double quotation mark
-@item @kbd{\'}
-@key{'}, a single quote or apostrophe
-@end table
-
-In addition to the @sc{gnu} Emacs style escape sequences, a second
-set of backslash escapes is available:
-
-@table @code
-@item \a
-alert (bell)
-@item \b
-backspace
-@item \d
-delete
-@item \f
-form feed
-@item \n
-newline
-@item \r
-carriage return
-@item \t
-horizontal tab
-@item \v
-vertical tab
-@item \@var{nnn}
-the eight-bit character whose value is the octal value @var{nnn}
-(one to three digits)
-@item \x@var{HH}
-the eight-bit character whose value is the hexadecimal value @var{HH}
-(one or two hex digits)
-@end table
-
-When entering the text of a macro, single or double quotes must
-be used to indicate a macro definition.
-Unquoted text is assumed to be a function name.
-In the macro body, the backslash escapes described above are expanded.
-Backslash will quote any other character in the macro text,
-including @samp{"} and @samp{'}.
-For example, the following binding will make @samp{@kbd{C-x} \}
-insert a single @samp{\} into the line:
-@example
-"\C-x\\": "\\"
-@end example
-
-@end table
-
-@node Conditional Init Constructs
-@subsection Conditional Init Constructs
-
-Readline implements a facility similar in spirit to the conditional
-compilation features of the C preprocessor which allows key
-bindings and variable settings to be performed as the result
-of tests. There are four parser directives used.
-
-@table @code
-@item $if
-The @code{$if} construct allows bindings to be made based on the
-editing mode, the terminal being used, or the application using
-Readline. The text of the test extends to the end of the line;
-no characters are required to isolate it.
-
-@table @code
-@item mode
-The @code{mode=} form of the @code{$if} directive is used to test
-whether Readline is in @code{emacs} or @code{vi} mode.
-This may be used in conjunction
-with the @samp{set keymap} command, for instance, to set bindings in
-the @code{emacs-standard} and @code{emacs-ctlx} keymaps only if
-Readline is starting out in @code{emacs} mode.
-
-@item term
-The @code{term=} form may be used to include terminal-specific
-key bindings, perhaps to bind the key sequences output by the
-terminal's function keys. The word on the right side of the
-@samp{=} is tested against both the full name of the terminal and
-the portion of the terminal name before the first @samp{-}. This
-allows @code{sun} to match both @code{sun} and @code{sun-cmd},
-for instance.
-
-@item application
-The @var{application} construct is used to include
-application-specific settings. Each program using the Readline
-library sets the @var{application name}, and you can test for
-a particular value.
-This could be used to bind key sequences to functions useful for
-a specific program. For instance, the following command adds a
-key sequence that quotes the current or previous word in Bash:
-@example
-$if Bash
-# Quote the current or previous word
-"\C-xq": "\eb\"\ef\""
-$endif
-@end example
-@end table
-
-@item $endif
-This command, as seen in the previous example, terminates an
-@code{$if} command.
-
-@item $else
-Commands in this branch of the @code{$if} directive are executed if
-the test fails.
-
-@item $include
-This directive takes a single filename as an argument and reads commands
-and bindings from that file.
-For example, the following directive reads from @file{/etc/inputrc}:
-@example
-$include /etc/inputrc
-@end example
-@end table
-
-@node Sample Init File
-@subsection Sample Init File
-
-Here is an example of an @var{inputrc} file. This illustrates key
-binding, variable assignment, and conditional syntax.
-
-@example
-@page
-# This file controls the behaviour of line input editing for
-# programs that use the GNU Readline library. Existing
-# programs include FTP, Bash, and GDB.
-#
-# You can re-read the inputrc file with C-x C-r.
-# Lines beginning with '#' are comments.
-#
-# First, include any systemwide bindings and variable
-# assignments from /etc/Inputrc
-$include /etc/Inputrc
-
-#
-# Set various bindings for emacs mode.
-
-set editing-mode emacs
-
-$if mode=emacs
-
-Meta-Control-h: backward-kill-word Text after the function name is ignored
-
-#
-# Arrow keys in keypad mode
-#
-#"\M-OD": backward-char
-#"\M-OC": forward-char
-#"\M-OA": previous-history
-#"\M-OB": next-history
-#
-# Arrow keys in ANSI mode
-#
-"\M-[D": backward-char
-"\M-[C": forward-char
-"\M-[A": previous-history
-"\M-[B": next-history
-#
-# Arrow keys in 8 bit keypad mode
-#
-#"\M-\C-OD": backward-char
-#"\M-\C-OC": forward-char
-#"\M-\C-OA": previous-history
-#"\M-\C-OB": next-history
-#
-# Arrow keys in 8 bit ANSI mode
-#
-#"\M-\C-[D": backward-char
-#"\M-\C-[C": forward-char
-#"\M-\C-[A": previous-history
-#"\M-\C-[B": next-history
-
-C-q: quoted-insert
-
-$endif
-
-# An old-style binding. This happens to be the default.
-TAB: complete
-
-# Macros that are convenient for shell interaction
-$if Bash
-# edit the path
-"\C-xp": "PATH=$@{PATH@}\e\C-e\C-a\ef\C-f"
-# prepare to type a quoted word --
-# insert open and close double quotes
-# and move to just after the open quote
-"\C-x\"": "\"\"\C-b"
-# insert a backslash (testing backslash escapes
-# in sequences and macros)
-"\C-x\\": "\\"
-# Quote the current or previous word
-"\C-xq": "\eb\"\ef\""
-# Add a binding to refresh the line, which is unbound
-"\C-xr": redraw-current-line
-# Edit variable on current line.
-"\M-\C-v": "\C-a\C-k$\C-y\M-\C-e\C-a\C-y="
-$endif
-
-# use a visible bell if one is available
-set bell-style visible
-
-# don't strip characters to 7 bits when reading
-set input-meta on
-
-# allow iso-latin1 characters to be inserted rather
-# than converted to prefix-meta sequences
-set convert-meta off
-
-# display characters with the eighth bit set directly
-# rather than as meta-prefixed characters
-set output-meta on
-
-# if there are more than 150 possible completions for
-# a word, ask the user if he wants to see all of them
-set completion-query-items 150
-
-# For FTP
-$if Ftp
-"\C-xg": "get \M-?"
-"\C-xt": "put \M-?"
-"\M-.": yank-last-arg
-$endif
-@end example
-
-@node Bindable Readline Commands
-@section Bindable Readline Commands
-
-@menu
-* Commands For Moving:: Moving about the line.
-* Commands For History:: Getting at previous lines.
-* Commands For Text:: Commands for changing text.
-* Commands For Killing:: Commands for killing and yanking.
-* Numeric Arguments:: Specifying numeric arguments, repeat counts.
-* Commands For Completion:: Getting Readline to do the typing for you.
-* Keyboard Macros:: Saving and re-executing typed characters
-* Miscellaneous Commands:: Other miscellaneous commands.
-@end menu
-
-This section describes Readline commands that may be bound to key
-sequences.
-@ifset BashFeatures
-You can list your key bindings by executing
-@w{@code{bind -P}} or, for a more terse format, suitable for an
-@var{inputrc} file, @w{@code{bind -p}}. (@xref{Bash Builtins}.)
-@end ifset
-Command names without an accompanying key sequence are unbound by default.
-
-In the following descriptions, @dfn{point} refers to the current cursor
-position, and @dfn{mark} refers to a cursor position saved by the
-@code{set-mark} command.
-The text between the point and mark is referred to as the @dfn{region}.
-
-@node Commands For Moving
-@subsection Commands For Moving
-@ftable @code
-@item beginning-of-line (C-a)
-Move to the start of the current line.
-
-@item end-of-line (C-e)
-Move to the end of the line.
-
-@item forward-char (C-f)
-Move forward a character.
-
-@item backward-char (C-b)
-Move back a character.
-
-@item forward-word (M-f)
-Move forward to the end of the next word. Words are composed of
-letters and digits.
-
-@item backward-word (M-b)
-Move back to the start of the current or previous word. Words are
-composed of letters and digits.
-
-@item clear-screen (C-l)
-Clear the screen and redraw the current line,
-leaving the current line at the top of the screen.
-
-@item redraw-current-line ()
-Refresh the current line. By default, this is unbound.
-
-@end ftable
-
-@node Commands For History
-@subsection Commands For Manipulating The History
-
-@ftable @code
-@item accept-line (Newline or Return)
-@ifset BashFeatures
-Accept the line regardless of where the cursor is.
-If this line is
-non-empty, add it to the history list according to the setting of
-the @env{HISTCONTROL} and @env{HISTIGNORE} variables.
-If this line is a modified history line, then restore the history line
-to its original state.
-@end ifset
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-Accept the line regardless of where the cursor is.
-If this line is
-non-empty, it may be added to the history list for future recall with
-@code{add_history()}.
-If this line is a modified history line, the history line is restored
-to its original state.
-@end ifclear
-
-@item previous-history (C-p)
-Move `back' through the history list, fetching the previous command.
-
-@item next-history (C-n)
-Move `forward' through the history list, fetching the next command.
-
-@item beginning-of-history (M-<)
-Move to the first line in the history.
-
-@item end-of-history (M->)
-Move to the end of the input history, i.e., the line currently
-being entered.
-
-@item reverse-search-history (C-r)
-Search backward starting at the current line and moving `up' through
-the history as necessary. This is an incremental search.
-
-@item forward-search-history (C-s)
-Search forward starting at the current line and moving `down' through
-the the history as necessary. This is an incremental search.
-
-@item non-incremental-reverse-search-history (M-p)
-Search backward starting at the current line and moving `up'
-through the history as necessary using a non-incremental search
-for a string supplied by the user.
-
-@item non-incremental-forward-search-history (M-n)
-Search forward starting at the current line and moving `down'
-through the the history as necessary using a non-incremental search
-for a string supplied by the user.
-
-@item history-search-forward ()
-Search forward through the history for the string of characters
-between the start of the current line and the point.
-This is a non-incremental search.
-By default, this command is unbound.
-
-@item history-search-backward ()
-Search backward through the history for the string of characters
-between the start of the current line and the point. This
-is a non-incremental search. By default, this command is unbound.
-
-@item yank-nth-arg (M-C-y)
-Insert the first argument to the previous command (usually
-the second word on the previous line) at point.
-With an argument @var{n},
-insert the @var{n}th word from the previous command (the words
-in the previous command begin with word 0). A negative argument
-inserts the @var{n}th word from the end of the previous command.
-
-@item yank-last-arg (M-. or M-_)
-Insert last argument to the previous command (the last word of the
-previous history entry). With an
-argument, behave exactly like @code{yank-nth-arg}.
-Successive calls to @code{yank-last-arg} move back through the history
-list, inserting the last argument of each line in turn.
-
-@end ftable
-
-@node Commands For Text
-@subsection Commands For Changing Text
-
-@ftable @code
-@item delete-char (C-d)
-Delete the character at point. If point is at the
-beginning of the line, there are no characters in the line, and
-the last character typed was not bound to @code{delete-char}, then
-return @sc{eof}.
-
-@item backward-delete-char (Rubout)
-Delete the character behind the cursor. A numeric argument means
-to kill the characters instead of deleting them.
-
-@item forward-backward-delete-char ()
-Delete the character under the cursor, unless the cursor is at the
-end of the line, in which case the character behind the cursor is
-deleted. By default, this is not bound to a key.
-
-@item quoted-insert (C-q or C-v)
-Add the next character typed to the line verbatim. This is
-how to insert key sequences like @kbd{C-q}, for example.
-
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-@item tab-insert (M-@key{TAB})
-Insert a tab character.
-@end ifclear
-
-@item self-insert (a, b, A, 1, !, @dots{})
-Insert yourself.
-
-@item transpose-chars (C-t)
-Drag the character before the cursor forward over
-the character at the cursor, moving the
-cursor forward as well. If the insertion point
-is at the end of the line, then this
-transposes the last two characters of the line.
-Negative arguments have no effect.
-
-@item transpose-words (M-t)
-Drag the word before point past the word after point,
-moving point past that word as well.
-If the insertion point is at the end of the line, this transposes
-the last two words on the line.
-
-@item upcase-word (M-u)
-Uppercase the current (or following) word. With a negative argument,
-uppercase the previous word, but do not move the cursor.
-
-@item downcase-word (M-l)
-Lowercase the current (or following) word. With a negative argument,
-lowercase the previous word, but do not move the cursor.
-
-@item capitalize-word (M-c)
-Capitalize the current (or following) word. With a negative argument,
-capitalize the previous word, but do not move the cursor.
-
-@item overwrite-mode ()
-Toggle overwrite mode. With an explicit positive numeric argument,
-switches to overwrite mode. With an explicit non-positive numeric
-argument, switches to insert mode. This command affects only
-@code{emacs} mode; @code{vi} mode does overwrite differently.
-Each call to @code{readline()} starts in insert mode.
-
-In overwrite mode, characters bound to @code{self-insert} replace
-the text at point rather than pushing the text to the right.
-Characters bound to @code{backward-delete-char} replace the character
-before point with a space.
-
-By default, this command is unbound.
-
-@end ftable
-
-@node Commands For Killing
-@subsection Killing And Yanking
-
-@ftable @code
-
-@item kill-line (C-k)
-Kill the text from point to the end of the line.
-
-@item backward-kill-line (C-x Rubout)
-Kill backward to the beginning of the line.
-
-@item unix-line-discard (C-u)
-Kill backward from the cursor to the beginning of the current line.
-
-@item kill-whole-line ()
-Kill all characters on the current line, no matter where point is.
-By default, this is unbound.
-
-@item kill-word (M-d)
-Kill from point to the end of the current word, or if between
-words, to the end of the next word.
-Word boundaries are the same as @code{forward-word}.
-
-@item backward-kill-word (M-@key{DEL})
-Kill the word behind point.
-Word boundaries are the same as @code{backward-word}.
-
-@item unix-word-rubout (C-w)
-Kill the word behind point, using white space as a word boundary.
-The killed text is saved on the kill-ring.
-
-@item delete-horizontal-space ()
-Delete all spaces and tabs around point. By default, this is unbound.
-
-@item kill-region ()
-Kill the text in the current region.
-By default, this command is unbound.
-
-@item copy-region-as-kill ()
-Copy the text in the region to the kill buffer, so it can be yanked
-right away. By default, this command is unbound.
-
-@item copy-backward-word ()
-Copy the word before point to the kill buffer.
-The word boundaries are the same as @code{backward-word}.
-By default, this command is unbound.
-
-@item copy-forward-word ()
-Copy the word following point to the kill buffer.
-The word boundaries are the same as @code{forward-word}.
-By default, this command is unbound.
-
-@item yank (C-y)
-Yank the top of the kill ring into the buffer at point.
-
-@item yank-pop (M-y)
-Rotate the kill-ring, and yank the new top. You can only do this if
-the prior command is @code{yank} or @code{yank-pop}.
-@end ftable
-
-@node Numeric Arguments
-@subsection Specifying Numeric Arguments
-@ftable @code
-
-@item digit-argument (@kbd{M-0}, @kbd{M-1}, @dots{} @kbd{M--})
-Add this digit to the argument already accumulating, or start a new
-argument. @kbd{M--} starts a negative argument.
-
-@item universal-argument ()
-This is another way to specify an argument.
-If this command is followed by one or more digits, optionally with a
-leading minus sign, those digits define the argument.
-If the command is followed by digits, executing @code{universal-argument}
-again ends the numeric argument, but is otherwise ignored.
-As a special case, if this command is immediately followed by a
-character that is neither a digit or minus sign, the argument count
-for the next command is multiplied by four.
-The argument count is initially one, so executing this function the
-first time makes the argument count four, a second time makes the
-argument count sixteen, and so on.
-By default, this is not bound to a key.
-@end ftable
-
-@node Commands For Completion
-@subsection Letting Readline Type For You
-
-@ftable @code
-@item complete (@key{TAB})
-Attempt to perform completion on the text before point.
-The actual completion performed is application-specific.
-@ifset BashFeatures
-Bash attempts completion treating the text as a variable (if the
-text begins with @samp{$}), username (if the text begins with
-@samp{~}), hostname (if the text begins with @samp{@@}), or
-command (including aliases and functions) in turn. If none
-of these produces a match, filename completion is attempted.
-@end ifset
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-The default is filename completion.
-@end ifclear
-
-@item possible-completions (M-?)
-List the possible completions of the text before point.
-
-@item insert-completions (M-*)
-Insert all completions of the text before point that would have
-been generated by @code{possible-completions}.
-
-@item menu-complete ()
-Similar to @code{complete}, but replaces the word to be completed
-with a single match from the list of possible completions.
-Repeated execution of @code{menu-complete} steps through the list
-of possible completions, inserting each match in turn.
-At the end of the list of completions, the bell is rung
-(subject to the setting of @code{bell-style})
-and the original text is restored.
-An argument of @var{n} moves @var{n} positions forward in the list
-of matches; a negative argument may be used to move backward
-through the list.
-This command is intended to be bound to @key{TAB}, but is unbound
-by default.
-
-@item delete-char-or-list ()
-Deletes the character under the cursor if not at the beginning or
-end of the line (like @code{delete-char}).
-If at the end of the line, behaves identically to
-@code{possible-completions}.
-This command is unbound by default.
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-@item complete-filename (M-/)
-Attempt filename completion on the text before point.
-
-@item possible-filename-completions (C-x /)
-List the possible completions of the text before point,
-treating it as a filename.
-
-@item complete-username (M-~)
-Attempt completion on the text before point, treating
-it as a username.
-
-@item possible-username-completions (C-x ~)
-List the possible completions of the text before point,
-treating it as a username.
-
-@item complete-variable (M-$)
-Attempt completion on the text before point, treating
-it as a shell variable.
-
-@item possible-variable-completions (C-x $)
-List the possible completions of the text before point,
-treating it as a shell variable.
-
-@item complete-hostname (M-@@)
-Attempt completion on the text before point, treating
-it as a hostname.
-
-@item possible-hostname-completions (C-x @@)
-List the possible completions of the text before point,
-treating it as a hostname.
-
-@item complete-command (M-!)
-Attempt completion on the text before point, treating
-it as a command name. Command completion attempts to
-match the text against aliases, reserved words, shell
-functions, shell builtins, and finally executable filenames,
-in that order.
-
-@item possible-command-completions (C-x !)
-List the possible completions of the text before point,
-treating it as a command name.
-
-@item dynamic-complete-history (M-@key{TAB})
-Attempt completion on the text before point, comparing
-the text against lines from the history list for possible
-completion matches.
-
-@item complete-into-braces (M-@{)
-Perform filename completion and insert the list of possible completions
-enclosed within braces so the list is available to the shell
-(@pxref{Brace Expansion}).
-
-@end ifset
-@end ftable
-
-@node Keyboard Macros
-@subsection Keyboard Macros
-@ftable @code
-
-@item start-kbd-macro (C-x ()
-Begin saving the characters typed into the current keyboard macro.
-
-@item end-kbd-macro (C-x ))
-Stop saving the characters typed into the current keyboard macro
-and save the definition.
-
-@item call-last-kbd-macro (C-x e)
-Re-execute the last keyboard macro defined, by making the characters
-in the macro appear as if typed at the keyboard.
-
-@end ftable
-
-@node Miscellaneous Commands
-@subsection Some Miscellaneous Commands
-@ftable @code
-
-@item re-read-init-file (C-x C-r)
-Read in the contents of the @var{inputrc} file, and incorporate
-any bindings or variable assignments found there.
-
-@item abort (C-g)
-Abort the current editing command and
-ring the terminal's bell (subject to the setting of
-@code{bell-style}).
-
-@item do-uppercase-version (M-a, M-b, M-@var{x}, @dots{})
-If the metafied character @var{x} is lowercase, run the command
-that is bound to the corresponding uppercase character.
-
-@item prefix-meta (@key{ESC})
-Metafy the next character typed. This is for keyboards
-without a meta key. Typing @samp{@key{ESC} f} is equivalent to typing
-@kbd{M-f}.
-
-@item undo (C-_ or C-x C-u)
-Incremental undo, separately remembered for each line.
-
-@item revert-line (M-r)
-Undo all changes made to this line. This is like executing the @code{undo}
-command enough times to get back to the beginning.
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-@item tilde-expand (M-&)
-@end ifset
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-@item tilde-expand (M-~)
-@end ifclear
-Perform tilde expansion on the current word.
-
-@item set-mark (C-@@)
-Set the mark to the point. If a
-numeric argument is supplied, the mark is set to that position.
-
-@item exchange-point-and-mark (C-x C-x)
-Swap the point with the mark. The current cursor position is set to
-the saved position, and the old cursor position is saved as the mark.
-
-@item character-search (C-])
-A character is read and point is moved to the next occurrence of that
-character. A negative count searches for previous occurrences.
-
-@item character-search-backward (M-C-])
-A character is read and point is moved to the previous occurrence
-of that character. A negative count searches for subsequent
-occurrences.
-
-@item insert-comment (M-#)
-Without a numeric argument, the value of the @code{comment-begin}
-variable is inserted at the beginning of the current line.
-If a numeric argument is supplied, this command acts as a toggle: if
-the characters at the beginning of the line do not match the value
-of @code{comment-begin}, the value is inserted, otherwise
-the characters in @code{comment-begin} are deleted from the beginning of
-the line.
-In either case, the line is accepted as if a newline had been typed.
-@ifset BashFeatures
-The default value of @code{comment-begin} causes this command
-to make the current line a shell comment.
-If a numeric argument causes the comment character to be removed, the line
-will be executed by the shell.
-@end ifset
-
-@item dump-functions ()
-Print all of the functions and their key bindings to the
-Readline output stream. If a numeric argument is supplied,
-the output is formatted in such a way that it can be made part
-of an @var{inputrc} file. This command is unbound by default.
-
-@item dump-variables ()
-Print all of the settable variables and their values to the
-Readline output stream. If a numeric argument is supplied,
-the output is formatted in such a way that it can be made part
-of an @var{inputrc} file. This command is unbound by default.
-
-@item dump-macros ()
-Print all of the Readline key sequences bound to macros and the
-strings they output. If a numeric argument is supplied,
-the output is formatted in such a way that it can be made part
-of an @var{inputrc} file. This command is unbound by default.
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-@item glob-complete-word (M-g)
-The word before point is treated as a pattern for pathname expansion,
-with an asterisk implicitly appended. This pattern is used to
-generate a list of matching file names for possible completions.
-
-@item glob-expand-word (C-x *)
-The word before point is treated as a pattern for pathname expansion,
-and the list of matching file names is inserted, replacing the word.
-If a numeric argument is supplied, a @samp{*} is appended before
-pathname expansion.
-
-@item glob-list-expansions (C-x g)
-The list of expansions that would have been generated by
-@code{glob-expand-word} is displayed, and the line is redrawn.
-If a numeric argument is supplied, a @samp{*} is appended before
-pathname expansion.
-
-@item display-shell-version (C-x C-v)
-Display version information about the current instance of Bash.
-
-@item shell-expand-line (M-C-e)
-Expand the line as the shell does.
-This performs alias and history expansion as well as all of the shell
-word expansions (@pxref{Shell Expansions}).
-
-@item history-expand-line (M-^)
-Perform history expansion on the current line.
-
-@item magic-space ()
-Perform history expansion on the current line and insert a space
-(@pxref{History Interaction}).
-
-@item alias-expand-line ()
-Perform alias expansion on the current line (@pxref{Aliases}).
-
-@item history-and-alias-expand-line ()
-Perform history and alias expansion on the current line.
-
-@item insert-last-argument (M-. or M-_)
-A synonym for @code{yank-last-arg}.
-
-@item operate-and-get-next (C-o)
-Accept the current line for execution and fetch the next line
-relative to the current line from the history for editing. Any
-argument is ignored.
-
-@item edit-and-execute-command (C-xC-e)
-Invoke an editor on the current command line, and execute the result as shell
-commands.
-Bash attempts to invoke
-@code{$FCEDIT}, @code{$EDITOR}, and @code{emacs}
-as the editor, in that order.
-
-@end ifset
-
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-@item emacs-editing-mode (C-e)
-When in @code{vi} command mode, this causes a switch to @code{emacs}
-editing mode.
-
-@item vi-editing-mode (M-C-j)
-When in @code{emacs} editing mode, this causes a switch to @code{vi}
-editing mode.
-
-@end ifclear
-
-@end ftable
-
-@node Readline vi Mode
-@section Readline vi Mode
-
-While the Readline library does not have a full set of @code{vi}
-editing functions, it does contain enough to allow simple editing
-of the line. The Readline @code{vi} mode behaves as specified in
-the @sc{posix} 1003.2 standard.
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-In order to switch interactively between @code{emacs} and @code{vi}
-editing modes, use the @samp{set -o emacs} and @samp{set -o vi}
-commands (@pxref{The Set Builtin}).
-@end ifset
-@ifclear BashFeatures
-In order to switch interactively between @code{emacs} and @code{vi}
-editing modes, use the command @kbd{M-C-j} (bound to emacs-editing-mode
-when in @code{vi} mode and to vi-editing-mode in @code{emacs} mode).
-@end ifclear
-The Readline default is @code{emacs} mode.
-
-When you enter a line in @code{vi} mode, you are already placed in
-`insertion' mode, as if you had typed an @samp{i}. Pressing @key{ESC}
-switches you into `command' mode, where you can edit the text of the
-line with the standard @code{vi} movement keys, move to previous
-history lines with @samp{k} and subsequent lines with @samp{j}, and
-so forth.
-
-@ifset BashFeatures
-@node Programmable Completion
-@section Programmable Completion
-@cindex programmable completion
-
-When word completion is attempted for an argument to a command for
-which a completion specification (a @var{compspec}) has been defined
-using the @code{complete} builtin (@pxref{Programmable Completion Builtins}),
-the programmable completion facilities are invoked.
-
-First, the command name is identified.
-If a compspec has been defined for that command, the
-compspec is used to generate the list of possible completions for the word.
-If the command word is a full pathname, a compspec for the full
-pathname is searched for first.
-If no compspec is found for the full pathname, an attempt is made to
-find a compspec for the portion following the final slash.
-
-Once a compspec has been found, it is used to generate the list of
-matching words.
-If a compspec is not found, the default Bash completion
-described above (@pxref{Commands For Completion}) is performed.
-
-First, the actions specified by the compspec are used.
-Only matches which are prefixed by the word being completed are
-returned.
-When the @option{-f} or @option{-d} option is used for filename or
-directory name completion, the shell variable @env{FIGNORE} is
-used to filter the matches.
-@xref{Bash Variables}, for a description of @env{FIGNORE}.
-
-Any completions specified by a filename expansion pattern to the
-@option{-G} option are generated next.
-The words generated by the pattern need not match the word being completed.
-The @env{GLOBIGNORE} shell variable is not used to filter the matches,
-but the @env{FIGNORE} shell variable is used.
-
-Next, the string specified as the argument to the @option{-W} option
-is considered.
-The string is first split using the characters in the @env{IFS}
-special variable as delimiters.
-Shell quoting is honored.
-Each word is then expanded using
-brace expansion, tilde expansion, parameter and variable expansion,
-command substitution, arithmetic expansion, and pathname expansion,
-as described above (@pxref{Shell Expansions}).
-The results are split using the rules described above
-(@pxref{Word Splitting}).
-The results of the expansion are prefix-matched against the word being
-completed, and the matching words become the possible completions.
-
-After these matches have been generated, any shell function or command
-specified with the @option{-F} and @option{-C} options is invoked.
-When the command or function is invoked, the @env{COMP_LINE} and
-@env{COMP_POINT} variables are assigned values as described above
-(@pxref{Bash Variables}).
-If a shell function is being invoked, the @env{COMP_WORDS} and
-@env{COMP_CWORD} variables are also set.
-When the function or command is invoked, the first argument is the
-name of the command whose arguments are being completed, the
-second argument is the word being completed, and the third argument
-is the word preceding the word being completed on the current command line.
-No filtering of the generated completions against the word being completed
-is performed; the function or command has complete freedom in generating
-the matches.
-
-Any function specified with @option{-F} is invoked first.
-The function may use any of the shell facilities, including the
-@code{compgen} builtin described below
-(@pxref{Programmable Completion Builtins}), to generate the matches.
-It must put the possible completions in the @env{COMPREPLY} array
-variable.
-
-Next, any command specified with the @option{-C} option is invoked
-in an environment equivalent to command substitution.
-It should print a list of completions, one per line, to
-the standard output.
-Backslash may be used to escape a newline, if necessary.
-
-After all of the possible completions are generated, any filter
-specified with the @option{-X} option is applied to the list.
-The filter is a pattern as used for pathname expansion; a @samp{&}
-in the pattern is replaced with the text of the word being completed.
-A literal @samp{&} may be escaped with a backslash; the backslash
-is removed before attempting a match.
-Any completion that matches the pattern will be removed from the list.
-A leading @samp{!} negates the pattern; in this case any completion
-not matching the pattern will be removed.
-
-Finally, any prefix and suffix specified with the @option{-P} and @option{-S}
-options are added to each member of the completion list, and the result is
-returned to the Readline completion code as the list of possible
-completions.
-
-If the previously-applied actions do not generate any matches, and the
-@option{-o dirnames} option was supplied to @code{complete} when the
-compspec was defined, directory name completion is attempted.
-
-By default, if a compspec is found, whatever it generates is returned to
-the completion code as the full set of possible completions.
-The default Bash completions are not attempted, and the Readline default
-of filename completion is disabled.
-If the @option{-o default} option was supplied to @code{complete} when the
-compspec was defined, Readline's default completion will be performed
-if the compspec generates no matches.
-
-When a compspec indicates that directory name completion is desired,
-the programmable completion functions force Readline to append a slash
-to completed names which are symbolic links to directories, subject to
-the value of the @var{mark-directories} Readline variable, regardless
-of the setting of the @var{mark-symlinked-directories} Readline variable.
-
-@node Programmable Completion Builtins
-@section Programmable Completion Builtins
-@cindex completion builtins
-
-Two builtin commands are available to manipulate the programmable completion
-facilities.
-
-@table @code
-@item compgen
-@btindex compgen
-@example
-@code{compgen [@var{option}] [@var{word}]}
-@end example
-
-Generate possible completion matches for @var{word} according to
-the @var{option}s, which may be any option accepted by the
-@code{complete}
-builtin with the exception of @option{-p} and @option{-r}, and write
-the matches to the standard output.
-When using the @option{-F} or @option{-C} options, the various shell variables
-set by the programmable completion facilities, while available, will not
-have useful values.
-
-The matches will be generated in the same way as if the programmable
-completion code had generated them directly from a completion specification
-with the same flags.
-If @var{word} is specified, only those completions matching @var{word}
-will be displayed.
-
-The return value is true unless an invalid option is supplied, or no
-matches were generated.
-
-@item complete
-@btindex complete
-@example
-@code{complete [-abcdefgjksuv] [-o @var{comp-option}] [-A @var{action}] [-G @var{globpat}] [-W @var{wordlist}]
-[-P @var{prefix}] [-S @var{suffix}] [-X @var{filterpat}] [-F @var{function}]
-[-C @var{command}] @var{name} [@var{name} @dots{}]}
-@code{complete -pr [@var{name} @dots{}]}
-@end example
-
-Specify how arguments to each @var{name} should be completed.
-If the @option{-p} option is supplied, or if no options are supplied, existing
-completion specifications are printed in a way that allows them to be
-reused as input.
-The @option{-r} option removes a completion specification for
-each @var{name}, or, if no @var{name}s are supplied, all
-completion specifications.
-
-The process of applying these completion specifications when word completion
-is attempted is described above (@pxref{Programmable Completion}).
-
-Other options, if specified, have the following meanings.
-The arguments to the @option{-G}, @option{-W}, and @option{-X} options
-(and, if necessary, the @option{-P} and @option{-S} options)
-should be quoted to protect them from expansion before the
-@code{complete} builtin is invoked.
-
-
-@table @code
-@item -o @var{comp-option}
-The @var{comp-option} controls several aspects of the compspec's behavior
-beyond the simple generation of completions.
-@var{comp-option} may be one of:
-
-@table @code
-
-@item default
-Use Readline's default filename completion if the compspec generates
-no matches.
-
-@item dirnames
-Perform directory name completion if the compspec generates no matches.
-
-@item filenames
-Tell Readline that the compspec generates filenames, so it can perform any
-filename\-specific processing (like adding a slash to directory names or
-suppressing trailing spaces). This option is intended to be used with
-shell functions specified with @option{-F}.
-
-@item nospace
-Tell Readline not to append a space (the default) to words completed at
-the end of the line.
-@end table
-
-@item -A @var{action}
-The @var{action} may be one of the following to generate a list of possible
-completions:
-
-@table @code
-@item alias
-Alias names. May also be specified as @option{-a}.
-
-@item arrayvar
-Array variable names.
-
-@item binding
-Readline key binding names (@pxref{Bindable Readline Commands}).
-
-@item builtin
-Names of shell builtin commands. May also be specified as @option{-b}.
-
-@item command
-Command names. May also be specified as @option{-c}.
-
-@item directory
-Directory names. May also be specified as @option{-d}.
-
-@item disabled
-Names of disabled shell builtins.
-
-@item enabled
-Names of enabled shell builtins.
-
-@item export
-Names of exported shell variables. May also be specified as @option{-e}.
-
-@item file
-File names. May also be specified as @option{-f}.
-
-@item function
-Names of shell functions.
-
-@item group
-Group names. May also be specified as @option{-g}.
-
-@item helptopic
-Help topics as accepted by the @code{help} builtin (@pxref{Bash Builtins}).
-
-@item hostname
-Hostnames, as taken from the file specified by the
-@env{HOSTFILE} shell variable (@pxref{Bash Variables}).
-
-@item job
-Job names, if job control is active. May also be specified as @option{-j}.
-
-@item keyword
-Shell reserved words. May also be specified as @option{-k}.
-
-@item running
-Names of running jobs, if job control is active.
-
-@item service
-Service names. May also be specified as @option{-s}.
-
-@item setopt
-Valid arguments for the @option{-o} option to the @code{set} builtin
-(@pxref{The Set Builtin}).
-
-@item shopt
-Shell option names as accepted by the @code{shopt} builtin
-(@pxref{Bash Builtins}).
-
-@item signal
-Signal names.
-
-@item stopped
-Names of stopped jobs, if job control is active.
-
-@item user
-User names. May also be specified as @option{-u}.
-
-@item variable
-Names of all shell variables. May also be specified as @option{-v}.
-@end table
-
-@item -G @var{globpat}
-The filename expansion pattern @var{globpat} is expanded to generate
-the possible completions.
-
-@item -W @var{wordlist}
-The @var{wordlist} is split using the characters in the
-@env{IFS} special variable as delimiters, and each resultant word
-is expanded.
-The possible completions are the members of the resultant list which
-match the word being completed.
-
-@item -C @var{command}
-@var{command} is executed in a subshell environment, and its output is
-used as the possible completions.
-
-@item -F @var{function}
-The shell function @var{function} is executed in the current shell
-environment.
-When it finishes, the possible completions are retrieved from the value
-of the @env{COMPREPLY} array variable.
-
-@item -X @var{filterpat}
-@var{filterpat} is a pattern as used for filename expansion.
-It is applied to the list of possible completions generated by the
-preceding options and arguments, and each completion matching
-@var{filterpat} is removed from the list.
-A leading @samp{!} in @var{filterpat} negates the pattern; in this
-case, any completion not matching @var{filterpat} is removed.
-
-@item -P @var{prefix}
-@var{prefix} is added at the beginning of each possible completion
-after all other options have been applied.
-
-@item -S @var{suffix}
-@var{suffix} is appended to each possible completion
-after all other options have been applied.
-@end table
-
-The return value is true unless an invalid option is supplied, an option
-other than @option{-p} or @option{-r} is supplied without a @var{name}
-argument, an attempt is made to remove a completion specification for
-a @var{name} for which no specification exists, or
-an error occurs adding a completion specification.
-
-@end table
-@end ifset
diff --git a/contrib/libreadline/doc/rluserman.texinfo b/contrib/libreadline/doc/rluserman.texinfo
deleted file mode 100644
index 89abe31aeb5a..000000000000
--- a/contrib/libreadline/doc/rluserman.texinfo
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,94 +0,0 @@
-\input texinfo @c -*-texinfo-*-
-@comment %**start of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-@setfilename rluserman.info
-@settitle GNU Readline Library
-@comment %**end of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
-@setchapternewpage odd
-
-@include manvers.texinfo
-
-@ifinfo
-@dircategory Libraries
-@direntry
-* RLuserman: (rluserman). The GNU readline library User's Manual.
-@end direntry
-
-This document describes the end user interface of the GNU Readline Library,
-a utility which aids in the consistency of user interface across discrete
-programs that need to provide a command line interface.
-
-Copyright (C) 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
-this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
-pare preserved on all copies.
-
-@ignore
-Permission is granted to process this file through TeX and print the
-results, provided the printed document carries copying permission
-notice identical to this one except for the removal of this paragraph
-(this paragraph not being relevant to the printed manual).
-@end ignore
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the entire
-resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission
-notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions,
-except that this permission notice may be stated in a translation approved
-by the Free Software Foundation.
-@end ifinfo
-
-@titlepage
-@title GNU Readline Library User Interface
-@subtitle Edition @value{EDITION}, for @code{Readline Library} Version @value{VERSION}.
-@subtitle @value{UPDATE-MONTH}
-@author Brian Fox, Free Software Foundation
-@author Chet Ramey, Case Western Reserve University
-
-@page
-This document describes the end user interface of the GNU Readline Library,
-a utility which aids in the consistency of user interface across discrete
-programs that need to provide a command line interface.
-
-Published by the Free Software Foundation @*
-59 Temple Place, Suite 330, @*
-Boston, MA 02111 USA
-
-Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
-this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
-are preserved on all copies.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
-manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the entire
-resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission
-notice identical to this one.
-
-Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
-into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions,
-except that this permission notice may be stated in a translation approved
-by the Free Software Foundation.
-
-@vskip 0pt plus 1filll
-Copyright @copyright{} 1988-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-@end titlepage
-
-@ifinfo
-@node Top
-@top GNU Readline Library
-
-This document describes the end user interface of the GNU Readline Library,
-a utility which aids in the consistency of user interface across discrete
-programs that need to provide a command line interface.
-
-@menu
-* Command Line Editing:: GNU Readline User's Manual.
-@end menu
-@end ifinfo
-
-@include rluser.texinfo
-
-@contents
-@bye